Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to write a Delphi 2009 application, which reads data from a socket. To do this, I need to write an event handler for the TIdTCPServer.OnExecute event.

I found lots of examples for implementing this in GUI applications, but I need to do it in a console application (without any windows).

How should I modify the code below in order to add an event handler (attach it to TCPServer), which prints every received message into the debug output?

unit ReceivingThreadUnit;

interface

uses
  Classes,
  IdTCPServer,
  IdSocketHandle,

  SysUtils,
  Windows;

type
  ReceivingThread = class(TThread)
    private
      TCPServer: TIdTCPServer;
    public
      procedure Run();

  end;

implementation

procedure ReceivingThread.Run();
var
  Bindings: TIdSocketHandles;
begin
  TCPServer := TIdTCPServer.Create(nil);

  //setup and start TCPServer
  Bindings := TIdSocketHandles.Create(TCPServer);
  try
    with Bindings.Add do
    begin
      IP := '127.0.0.1';
      Port := 9998;
    end;
    try
      TCPServer.Bindings:=Bindings;
      // Here I want to attach TCPServer to an OnExecute event handler
      TCPServer.Active:=True;
    except on E:Exception do
      OutputDebugString(PChar(E.ToString));
    end;
  finally
    Bindings.Free;
    TCPServer.Free;
  end;
  TCPServer.Active := true;
end;

end.
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need to add an event handler to your class. And then connect it up:

TCPServer.OnExecute := Self.ExecuteHandler;
share|improve this answer

As David said (but did not fully show), you need to declare a method in your thread class and then assign it to the OnExecute event.

On a side note, you should not be creating a TIdSocketHandles collection manually. Call Add() on the existing TIdTCPServer.Bindings collection instead.

Try this:

unit ReceivingThreadUnit;

interface

uses
  Classes,
  IdTCPServer,
  IdSocketHandle,
  IdContext,

  SysUtils,
  Windows;

type
  ReceivingThread = class(TThread)
  private
    TCPServer: TIdTCPServer;
    procedure ExecuteHandler(AContext: TIdContext);
  public
    procedure Run;
  end;

implementation

procedure ReceivingThread.ExecuteHandler(AContext: TIdContext);
begin
  //...
end;

procedure ReceivingThread.Run;
begin
  //setup and start TCPServer
  TCPServer := TIdTCPServer.Create(nil);
  try
    with TCPServer.Bindings.Add do
    begin
      IP := '127.0.0.1';
      Port := 9998;
    end;
    TCPServer.OnExecute := ExecuteHandler;
    try
      TCPServer.Active := True;
    except
      on E: Exception do
        OutputDebugString(PChar(E.ToString));
    end;
    while not Terminated do
      Sleep(1000);
    TCPServer.Active := False;
  finally
    TCPServer.Free;
  end;
end;

end.

With that said, your receiveing thread is actually pretty redundant since TIdTCPServer is already multi-threaded, so you could alternatively just eliminate the thread class altogether:

program MyApp;

{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}

{$R *.res}

uses
  Classes,
  IdTCPServer,
  IdSocketHandle,
  IdContext,

  SysUtils,
  Windows;

type
  TCPServerEvents = class
  public
    class procedure ExecuteHandler(AContext: TIdContext);
  end;

class procedure TCPServerEvents.ExecuteHandler(AContext: TIdContext);
begin
  //...
end;

var
  TCPServer: TIdTCPServer;
begin
  //setup and start TCPServer
  TCPServer := TIdTCPServer.Create(nil);
  try
    with TCPServer.Bindings.Add do
    begin
      IP := '127.0.0.1';
      Port := 9998;
    end;

    TCPServer.OnExecute := TCPServerEvents.ExecuteHandler;

    try
      TCPServer.Active := True;
    except
      on E: Exception do
        OutputDebugString(PChar(E.ToString));
    end;

    while (not stop condition) do
      Sleep(1000);

    TCPServer.Active := False;
  finally
    TCPServer.Free;
  end;
end.
share|improve this answer
    
Nice. I find your trick with of object a little dirty. But I understand why you don't want to instantiate an object. A nice variant is to use a class method. Sure you need to declare a class, but you don't need to instantiate an instance which is the main bit of boiler plate that you want to avoid. –  David Heffernan Nov 14 '12 at 7:07
    
Good to know, thanks. I have updated my answer to use it. –  Remy Lebeau Nov 14 '12 at 17:25

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.