Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

I've made this jsfiddle

the html:

<div id="launchmain" >
<div id="box1"></div>
<div id="box2"></div>
<div id="box3"></div>
<div id="box4"></div>
    <div id ="maininvite">
        <h2> header</h2>
        <p>not a lot of text here but still overflowing</p>
    </div>
<div id="box6"></div>
<div id="box7"></div>
<div id="box8"></div>
<div id="box9"></div>
</div>

with css:

html, body {
 height: 100%;
 width: 100%;    
}
#launchmain {
 width: 55%;
 display: inline-block;
 position: relative;
    top:10%;
    left:25%;
}
#launchmain:after {
    padding-top: 79.26%; 
    display: block;
    content: '';
    margin-top: 10px;
}
#box1
{
    border: 1px solid #000000;

    position: absolute;
    width:25.37%; 
    height:21.88%            
}
#box2
{
    border: 1px solid #000000;
    width: 48.48%;
    height:21.88%;
    position: absolute;
    left:25.64%
}
#box3
{
    border: 1px solid #000000;
    width:25.37%; 
    height:21.88%;
    position: absolute;
    left:74.39%;
}
#box4
{
    border: 1px solid #000000;
    width:33.235%; 
    height:53.84%;
    position: absolute;
    top:22.07%;
}
#maininvite
{
    border: 1px solid #000000;
    width:33.53%; 
    height:53.84%;
    position: absolute;
    top:22.07%;
    left: 33.235%;
}
#box6
{
    border: 1px solid #000000;
    width:33.235%; 
    height:53.84%;
    position: absolute;
    top:22.07%;
    left: 66.765%;
}
#box7
{
    border: 1px solid #000000;
   width:25.37%; 
    height:21.88% ;
    position: absolute;
    top:76.2%;

}
#box8
{
    border: 1px solid #000000;
  width: 48.48%;
    height:21.88%;
    position: absolute;
   left:25.64%;
    top:76.2%;
}
#box9
{
    border: 1px solid #000000;
    width:25.37%; 
    height:21.88% ;
    position: absolute;
    top:76.2%;
    left:74.39%;
}
#maininvite h2{

    font-size: 180%;
}

p{
    position: relative;
    font-size: 80%;
}
​

It is made of 9 boxes, with the middle on has text it in. I've made it so the boxes so they will resize with the screen resize so it will remain in the same place all the time.

The text, however, doesn't resize - even when I use percentage.

  1. How do I resize the text so it will always be the same ratio from the entire page?
  2. Is this a proper solution to handle multiple resolutions? or should I have many @media checks in the css and have many layouts for each media types?
share|improve this question
3  
Your text size will not adjust by using a percentage, it will remain constant. This is not a percentage of it's container div, it is a percentage of the text size that is set in the container. – Luke Nov 13 '12 at 9:26
    
Its not possible with just CSS. You would need to use Javascript. Have a look at this, I know it keeps the text on 1 line in the following question but it should get you on the right lines stackoverflow.com/questions/3401136/… – Adam Nov 13 '12 at 9:27
up vote 18 down vote accepted

In regards to your code, see @Coulton. You'll need to use JavaScript.

Checkout either FitText (it does work in IE, they just ballsed their site somehow) or BigText.

FitText will allow you to scale some text in relation to the container it is in, while BigText is more about resizing different sections of text to be the same width within the container.

BigText will set your string to exactly the width of the container, whereas FitText is less pixel perfect. It starts by setting the font-size at 1/10th of the container element's width. It doesn't work very well with all fonts by default, but it has a setting which allows you to decrease or increase the 'power' of the re-size. It also allows you to set a min and max font-size. It will take a bit of fiddling to get working the first time, but does work great.

http://marabeas.io <- playing with it currently here. As far as I understand, BigText wouldn't work in my context at all.

For those of you using Angularjs, here's an Angular version of FitText I've made.


Here's a LESS mixin you can use to make @humanityANDpeace's solution a little more pretty:

@mqIterations: 19;
.fontResize(@i) when (@i > 0) {
    @media all and (min-width: 100px * @i) { body { font-size:0.2em * @i; } }
    .fontResize((@i - 1));
}
.fontResize(@mqIterations);

And an SCSS version thanks to @NIXin!

$mqIterations: 19;
@mixin fontResize($iterations) { 
    $i: 1; 
    @while $i <= $iterations { 
        @media all and (min-width: 100px * $i) { body { font-size:0.2em * $i; } } 
        $i: $i + 1; 
    }
} 
@include fontResize($mqIterations);
share|improve this answer
3  
I think that "You'll need to use JavaScript", plus your snippet at the end, implies that if you wanted to provide a CSS-only solution as well, it should be a separate answer. – Ian Clark Jun 25 '14 at 9:45
1  
Here's a SCSS version of your mixin: $mqIterations: 19; @mixin fontResize($iterations) { $i: 1; @while $i <= $iterations { @media all and (min-width: 100px * $i) { body { font-size:0.2em * $i; } } $i: $i + 1; } } @include fontResize($mqIterations); – niieani Nov 20 '14 at 1:09

My answer does not require Javascript and only relies on CSS3 (available in most modern browsers). I personally like it very much if design is not relying on Javascript too much.

My answer is a "pure CSS3 , no Javascript required"-solution:

The solution as can be seen here (http://jsfiddle.net/uNF3Z/16/) uses the following additions to the CSS styles (which make use of the @media query of CSS3 which)

@media all and (min-width: 50px)   {  body  { font-size:0.1em;  } }
@media all and (min-width: 100px)  {  body  { font-size:0.2em;  } }
@media all and (min-width: 200px)  {  body  { font-size:0.4em;  } }
@media all and (min-width: 300px)  {  body  { font-size:0.6em;  } }
@media all and (min-width: 400px)  {  body  { font-size:0.8em;  } }
@media all and (min-width: 500px)  {  body  { font-size:1.0em;  } }
@media all and (min-width: 600px)  {  body  { font-size:1.2em;  } }
@media all and (min-width: 700px)  {  body  { font-size:1.4em;  } }
@media all and (min-width: 800px)  {  body  { font-size:1.6em;  } }
@media all and (min-width: 900px)  {  body  { font-size:1.8em;  } }
@media all and (min-width: 1000px) {  body  { font-size:2.0em;  } }
@media all and (min-width: 1100px) {  body  { font-size:2.2em;  } }
@media all and (min-width: 1200px) {  body  { font-size:2.4em;  } }
@media all and (min-width: 1300px) {  body  { font-size:2.6em;  } }
@media all and (min-width: 1400px) {  body  { font-size:2.8em;  } }
@media all and (min-width: 1500px) {  body  { font-size:3.0em;  } }
@media all and (min-width: 1500px) {  body  { font-size:3.2em;  } }
@media all and (min-width: 1600px) {  body  { font-size:3.4em;  } }
@media all and (min-width: 1700px) {  body  { font-size:3.6em;  } }

What this in effect causes is that the font-size is adjusted to the available screen width. This adjustment is done in steps of 100px (which is finegrained enough for most purposes) and covers a maximum screen width of 1700px which I reckon to be amply (2013) and can by adding further lines be further improved.

A side benefit is that the adjustment of the font-size is occuring at each resize. This dynamic adjustment (because for instance the browser windows is resized) might not yet be covered by the Javascript based solution.

share|improve this answer
1  
Ugly as hell, but works! thanks! :) – ouhma Nov 15 '13 at 12:46
    
Interesting approach, I agree it's ugly but it works a treat for my requirements. Thank you. – Jonathan Apr 3 '14 at 8:09
    
Added a LESS version of this to my answer - makes it a little more pretty : ) – Patrick Apr 5 '14 at 4:02
1  
If you are resizing based on window width and not on the container div size as this case addresses using 'vw' units would be much easier. – Evan Cordeiro Apr 19 '14 at 20:55
    
I tweaked your code to use min-height rather than min-width, so that the height of the DIVs is (somewhat) proportional to the height of the font. – alfadog67 May 30 '14 at 17:55

I was looking for the same funcionality and found this answer. However, I wanted to give you guys a quick update. It's CSS3's vmin unit.

p, li
{
  font-size: 1.2vmin;
}

vmin means 'whichever is smaller between the 1% of the ViewPort's height and the 1% of the ViewPort's width'.

More info on SitePoint

share|improve this answer
2  
Whilst this is the nicest answer, it's definitely worth noting the lack of browser support – Ian Clark Jun 25 '14 at 10:14
    
This doesn't really solve the issue at hand though. But combined with calc() function it could prove quite useful. The browser support nowadays is pretty good, if all you care about is "modern" users, you're pretty much covered. – niieani Nov 20 '14 at 1:14
    
Why do you say it doesn't solve the issue? It should resize the font according to the viewport size. – amenadiel Nov 20 '14 at 1:37
    
Do you know how works the vmin in safari and opera browsers? – user2301515 Dec 2 '15 at 8:03

Here's a SCSS version of @Patrick's mixin.

$mqIterations: 19;
@mixin fontResize($iterations)
{
  $i: 1;
  @while $i <= $iterations
  {
    @media all and (min-width: 100px * $i) {
      body { font-size:0.2em * $i; }
    }
    $i: $i + 1;
  }
}
@include fontResize($mqIterations);
share|improve this answer

The answer that i am presenting is very simple, instead of using "px","em" or "%", i'll use "vw". In short it might look like this:- h1 {font-size: 5.9vw;} when used for heading purposes.

See this:Demo

For more details:Main tutorial

share|improve this answer
    
Can you fix your formatting and maybe add a little more explanation to this please? – khelwood Dec 3 '14 at 19:11
    
One unit of vw is 1% of the viewport axis. "Viewport" == browser window size == window object. If the viewport is 40cm wide, 1vw == 0.4cm. – Abhishek Sen Dec 3 '14 at 19:35
    
for example just changed "font-size: 80%" to "font-size: 2.5vw" , jsfiddle – Abhishek Sen Dec 3 '14 at 19:51

I have had a go to made my own answer to this, in a way I think is easier, please look here:

Text resize on browser resize, my simple answer

share|improve this answer
    
Your link no longer exists ;( – AdamJones May 6 at 20:46

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.