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What is the best way to handle exceptions thrown somewhere in a task continuation?

For example, I have a simple task continuation below (updateMessages -> updateInterface) but in reality this could be a chain of more than 2 tasks. I want to have a generic exception "catch all" task which continues from any fault which could occur in the chain.

How I'm doing this is by defining an Action (which observes and logs the exception) and continuing from each task with TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnFaulted set. Is there perhaps a better way of doing this?

Task updateMessages = Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
{
    // Do stuff
});

Task updateInterface = updateMessages.ContinueWith(task =>
  {
    // UI updates
  }, 
  System.Threading.CancellationToken.None, 
  TaskContinuationOptions.NotOnFaulted,
  TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext());

Action<Task> failureAction = new Action<Task>(failedTask =>
{
    // Observe and log exceptions
});

updateMessages.ContinueWith(failureAction, CancellationToken.None,
                            TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnFaulted,
                            TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext());
updateInterface.ContinueWith(failureAction, CancellationToken.None,          
                             TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnFaulted, 
                             TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext());
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your approach is the approach I use, and it works well.

A couple of asides that aren't about the question:

  • Does your failureAction really need to run on the main UI thread?
  • I'd write a helper method to attach the failure continuation since you're going to be doing this with every task.
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They don't necessarily need to be on the UI thread unless some control update is required. The helper method is a good idea. Thanks :) –  davenewza Nov 14 '12 at 6:49
1  
Great. In that case, I would say don't have it always be scheduled on the ui thread (since that costs extra), and rather, if the control needs to update a control, invoke using that control. (It's a minor point since we are only talking about the case of a fault anyways). –  Matt Smith Nov 14 '12 at 14:22
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