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I'm in a dilemma to choose the return type of collections when writing generic extension methods for an API. I have read discussions on SO on what collection type to return and what should be the design choices. I generally prefer to accept the most basic type as argument and return the richest type.

I'm now thinking of returning the same type that is provided with. Irrespective of whether this is a good choice or not, is there a way this can be accomplished in an easy to use manner?

For eg. lets I have this:

 public static IEnumerable<T> Generize<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source)
                                         where T : new()
 {
     var lst = source.ToList();
     lst.Add(new T());
     return lst.AsEnumerable(); //since return type is IEnumerable.
 }

Now I want to return an IEnumerable, ICollection or IList depending on the argument source. So I modified this a bit.

 public static S Generize<S, T>(this S source) where S : IEnumerable<T>
                                               where T : new()
 {
     var lst = source.ToList();
     lst.Add(new T());
     return (S)lst.AsEnumerable(); //not sure if this works
 }

The main problem I'm facing is I can't get to call the function Generize.

var d = new List<int> { 23, 23 };

d.Generize(); //can not find definition and no extension method by the name.....

d.Generize<List<int>, int>(); //works but so ugly..
  1. As Marc points out the casting doesn't work everywhere. Is there a better way to return a collection of type S from a List<T> if S is anyway a IEnumerable<T> ?

  2. Can it be done without specifying types such that types are inferred automatically?

  3. Also why is d.Generize() giving definition not found error rather than types cannot be inferred error?

Edit:

Though IEnumberable<T> can be of any concrete type, in my case it would have been only the normally found ones like T[] or List<T> or few more from Linq namsespace. Handling them all wont be easy. Just pointing out that the original question doesn't make sense to me now. Thanks all..!

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The "works but so ugly" is only working by accident; if you tried it with an array or a Collection<T>, it would error –  Marc Gravell Nov 13 '12 at 10:18
    
@MarcGravell let me see to it. Thanks. –  nawfal Nov 13 '12 at 10:19
    
@MarcGravell I'm not getting you. I tried with int[] and ICollection<T> and it works.. –  nawfal Nov 13 '12 at 10:27
    
if S is int[], you get "Unable to cast object of type 'System.Collections.Generic.List1[System.Int32]' to type 'System.Int32[]'.". If S` is Collection<int>, you get "Unable to cast object of type 'System.Collections.Generic.List1[System.Int32]' to type 'System.Collections.ObjectModel.Collection1[System.Int32]'.". Basically, the code you've marked with "not sure if this works": doesn't. –  Marc Gravell Nov 13 '12 at 10:34
1  
Hmm I realise my question is partly foolish as IEnumerable<T> can be of any flavour including custom types. I will try to post an answer myself that deals with reflection, just for the sake of answer. –  nawfal Nov 13 '12 at 19:35

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Warning: Ok my question hasn't been great, and my thinking a bit foolish. This is just to answer my post and I don't recommend it. I will rely on returning a proper List<T> in production code.

One way is to handle a few known types of collection classes

public static S Generize<S, T>(this S source, T dummyVariable) 
                              where S : class, IEnumerable<T>
{
    var lst = source.ToList();
    lst.Add(dummyVariable);

    if (source is T[])
        return lst.ToArray() as S;

    if (source is List<T>)
        return lst as S;

    if (source is Collection<T>)
        return new Collection<T>(lst) as S;

    throw new TypeAccessException();
}

To be bit more general, I will use some reflection..

public static S Generize<S, T>(this S source, T dummyVariable) 
                              where S : class, IEnumerable<T>
{
    var lst = source.ToList();
    lst.Add(dummyVariable);

    if (source is Array)
        return lst.ToArray() as S;

    foreach (var c in typeof(S).GetConstructors())
    {
        var p = c.GetParameters();

        if (p.Length != 1)
            continue;

        if (typeof(IEnumerable<T>).IsAssignableFrom(p[0].ParameterType))
            return Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(S), lst) as S;
    }

    throw new TypeAccessException();
}

Question 2 has been answered here and question 3 remains a mystery.

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