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I have a table called Objects which contains some files, say:

  1. User
  2. Teacher

There is another table (States) which holds the possible states of these objects, like:

  1. Active
  2. Idle
  3. Teaching
  4. Resting
  5. Authoring

And there is a third table (junction table) which logs each state change of each object. In this third table (ObjectStates) records are like:

  1. 1, 1, DateTime1 (User was active on DateTime1)
  2. 2, 5, DateTime2 (Teacher was authoring on DateTime2)

etc.

Now, what I want is a query to get each object, with its latest state (not state history). It's possible to get this result using cursors, or using Cross Apply command. However, I'd like to know if there is any other way to get the latest states of each object from these three tables? Because cursors are costy.

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A common pattern here is to have an active flag in the ObjectStates table and only have that flag on the latest record. –  Albin Sunnanbo Nov 13 '12 at 10:46
    
Also, since the state of an object might be a more common thing to query than the state change history, I would keep the current state at the object level for performance reasons. –  CyberDude Nov 13 '12 at 10:47
    
Which version of SQL Server are you using? (Are you refusing to use CROSS APPLY because you're on SQL Server 2000 or something? Another option is to use ROW_NUMBER(), but that is also not available in SQL Server 2000.) –  MatBailie Nov 13 '12 at 10:53
    
I'm using SQL Server 2008 –  Mehdi Emrani Nov 13 '12 at 10:53
3  
@MehdiEmrani - Then why are you refusing to use APPLY? The answers here are good, but so is OUTER APPLY (SELECT TOP 1 * FROM x WHERE blah ORDER BY timestamp DESC) AS ActiveState –  MatBailie Nov 13 '12 at 10:55
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Using the row_number() windowing function...

select * 
from
(

select objects.*,
       state.state,
       objectstates.changedate,
       row_number() over (partition by object.objectid order by changedate desc) rn
from 
    objects
         inner join
    objectstates
         on objects.id = objectstates.objectid
         inner join
    states 
         on objectstates.stateid = states.stateid
) v
where rn = 1

If you can't use row_number because you're on SQL 2000, for example, you can use a join on a max/group by query.

select objects.*,
       state.state,
       objectstates.changedate,
from 
    objects
         inner join
    objectstates
         on objects.id = objectstates.objectid
         inner join
    states 
         on objectstates.stateid = states.stateid
    inner join
         (select objectid, max(changedate) as maxdate from objectstates group by objectid) maxstates
         on objectstates.objectid=maxstates.objectid
         and objectstates.changedate = maxstates.maxdate
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row_number(). Great note. +1. –  Saeed Neamati Nov 13 '12 at 10:51
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You can join on the ObjectStates table twice. The first join of the table will get the max(activedate) for each objectid. The second time, you will join on both the objectid and the value of the max(activedate) and this will get the state associated with that value:

select o.name o_name,
  s.name s_name,
  os1.activedate
from objects o
left join
(
  select max(activeDate) activedate, objectid
  from objectstates
  group by objectid
) os1
  on o.id = os1.objectid
left join ObjectStates os2
  on os1.objectid = os2. objectid
  and os1.activedate = os2.activedate
left join states s
  on os2.stateid = s.id

See SQL Fiddle with Demo

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+1 : SQL Server 2000 compatible answer –  MatBailie Nov 13 '12 at 10:52
1  
Not perfect. When two things can happen on the same day. But given the right data and eliminating that possibility, will run faster than what I had. –  RichardTheKiwi Nov 13 '12 at 11:00
1  
@RichardTheKiwi - There is an argument to say that if two changes are timestamped with the exact same value, the state is indeterminate. In that case there is an argument to return all possible values rather than a single arbitrary value. Whether the arguments are valid depends on the business case. My point being that Not Perfect could be equally applied to this answer and to all the other answers, and is a reflection of the data and the functional requirement not having a perfect match. –  MatBailie Nov 13 '12 at 11:05
1  
@bluefeet Every answer's got a downvote. Can't see a reason for any of them. –  podiluska Nov 13 '12 at 11:30
1  
@RichardTheKiwi - If the schema allows multiple records with exactly the same timestamp, all such records have an equal claim to being the latest record. None in that group can claim to be later than any of the others. If the functional requirement requires a single record, but the schema allows multiple records, the requirement and the DDL don't match. Which is more right, to select one arbitrarily (and possibly a different one every time) or to select them all? I contend that neither is correct, for the scenario described the functional requirement is inadequate (Not Perfect). –  MatBailie Nov 13 '12 at 11:39
show 6 more comments

You can use partition over to find the latest row for each Object, like this

create table #ObjectState
(
    Object int NOT NULL,
    State int NOT NULL,
    TimeStamp datetime NOT NULL
)

INSERT INTO #ObjectState (Object, State, TimeStamp) VALUES (1, 1, '2012-01-01')
INSERT INTO #ObjectState (Object, State, TimeStamp) VALUES (1, 2, '2012-01-02')
INSERT INTO #ObjectState (Object, State, TimeStamp) VALUES (1, 3, '2012-01-03')
INSERT INTO #ObjectState (Object, State, TimeStamp) VALUES (2, 4, '2012-01-01')
INSERT INTO #ObjectState (Object, State, TimeStamp) VALUES (2, 2, '2012-01-02')

select *, ROW_NUMBER() over (partition by Object order by TimeStamp desc) as RowNo from #ObjectState

select InnerSelect.Object, InnerSelect.State, InnerSelect.TimeStamp FROM
(
select *, ROW_NUMBER() over (partition by Object order by TimeStamp desc) as RowNo from #ObjectState
) InnerSelect
where InnerSelect.RowNo = 1


DROP TABLE #ObjectState

gives output

Object  State  TimeStamp
1       3      2012-01-03 00:00:00.000
2       2      2012-01-02 00:00:00.000

for the last select

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In the good old days, we just used Scalar subqueries.

select o.*, (select top(1) s.description
               from objectstates os
               join states s on s.id = os.state_id
              where os.object_id = o.id
           order by os.recorded_time desc) last_state 
  from objects o;

Which CROSS APPLY replaces. To extend it to more fields, it had to be extended something like

select *
  from (
select o.*, (select top(1) os.id
               from objectstates os
              where os.object_id = o.id
           order by os.recorded_time desc) last_state 
  from objects o
       ) x
   join objectstates os on os.id = x.last_state
   join states s on s.id = os.state_id;
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