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List<Int32> dansConList = new List<Int32>();
dansConList[0] = 1;
dansConList[1] = 2;
dansConList[2] = 3;

List<Int32> dansRandomList = new List<Int32>();
dansRandomList[0] = 1;
dansRandomList[1] = 2;
dansRandomList[2] = 4;

I need a method that, when evaluating the above lists, will return false for dansRandomList and true for dansConList based on the fact dansConList has a consecutive number sequence in it's values, and dansRandomList does not (missing the value 3).

Using LINQ is preferable, if possible.

What I've Tried:

  • For the sake of achieving the end result, I have used a for loop and compare with 'i' (loop counter) to evaluate the values, but as mentioned above I'd like to use LINQ for this.
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4  
What have you tried? –  Kirk Broadhurst Nov 13 '12 at 10:45
3  
Why do you want to use Linq? Linq incurs a performance penalty: the benefit is program maintenance and abstraction, especially for databases in LinqToSql and EF. I can't see why it's of any use for you here, other than being 2008-buzzword-compliant. –  Dai Nov 13 '12 at 10:48
1  
There's no very neat way to do it with LINQ, because it would deal with each item in isolation. You could do something with Aggregate, but it would be ugly. You can check whether a list contains all items between to integers using Enumerable.Range() and Except. But checking for consecutiveness, seems like a for loop is the way to go –  Kieren Johnstone Nov 13 '12 at 10:49
    
Look at this post: bugsquash.blogspot.se/2010/01/… –  Jocke Nov 13 '12 at 10:49
1  
@DeeMac What results do you want for {1, 3, 2} (contains consecutive numbers, but in wrong order) {3, 2} (consecutive but descending), or {3, 2, 3}? –  CodesInChaos Nov 13 '12 at 11:36

8 Answers 8

up vote 16 down vote accepted

One-liner, only iterates until the first non-consecutive element:

bool isConsecutive = !myIntList.Select((i,j) => i-j).Distinct().Skip(1).Any();

Update: a couple examples of how this works:

Input is { 5, 6, 7, 8 }
Select yields { (5-0=)5, (6-1=)5, (7-2=)5, (8-3=)5 }
Distinct yields { 5, (5 not distinct, 5 not distinct, 5 not distinct) }
Skip yields { (5 skipped, nothing left) }
Any returns false
Input is { 1, 2, 6, 7 }
Select yields { (1-0=)1, (2-1=)1, (6-2=)4, (7-3=)4 } *
Distinct yields { 1, (1 not distinct,) 4, (4 not distinct) } *
Skip yields { (1 skipped,) 4 }
Any returns true

* The Select will not yield the second 4 and the Distinct will not check it, as the Any will stop after finding the first 4.

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1  
Does this work if the list starts with a value other than 0? I think it plain doesn't.. Nevermind that, of course it does (checking difference from the index each time.. should be constant). Nice –  Kieren Johnstone Nov 13 '12 at 11:30
    
@KierenJohnstone yep it does, the "value" is just a non-zero value, hence the distinct and skip.... nevermind. :P –  Cameron MacFarland Nov 13 '12 at 11:31
2  
+1 Creative use of linq, maybe at the expense of readability :) –  Johan Larsson Nov 13 '12 at 21:53
    
Distinct adds the first value to a hash set, then yields it; tries to add the second value and yields it if it wasn't already in the set; tries to add the third value etc. It doesn't have to consume the whole input before it can start yielding items. –  Rawling Nov 16 '12 at 6:28
1  
@DeeMac I've added in some examples as to how this works. –  Rawling Nov 19 '12 at 9:37
var min = list.Min();
var max = list.Max();
var all = Enumerable.Range(min, max - min + 1);
return list.SequenceEqual(all);
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Very well done! –  VicoMan Nov 13 '12 at 10:54
2  
@Kieren Johnstone Should be Enumerable.Range(min, max-min) –  user1793607 Nov 13 '12 at 10:55
3  
My problem with this is it enumerates the original list 3 times, once for min, once for max, and once for comparison. –  Cameron MacFarland Nov 13 '12 at 10:56
2  
incorrect, second param of Range is count –  CodesInChaos Nov 13 '12 at 10:56
    
Phew, thanks CodesInChaos –  Kieren Johnstone Nov 13 '12 at 11:00

You can use this extension method:

public static bool IsConsecutive(this IEnumerable<int> ints )
{
    //if (!ints.Any())
    //    return true; //Is empty consecutive?
    // I think I prefer exception for empty list but I guess it depends
    int start = ints.First();
    return !ints.Where((x, i) => x != i+start).Any();
}

Use it like this:

[Test]
public void ConsecutiveTest()
{
    var ints = new List<int> {1, 2, 4};
    bool isConsecutive = ints.IsConsecutive();
}
share|improve this answer
    
try Enumerable.Empty<int>(). Boom. –  CodesInChaos Nov 13 '12 at 11:01
    
Yes, that is true. I guess it is a matter of taste but I think an exception is in place if Enumerable.Empty<int>() is passed. Should I change? –  Johan Larsson Nov 13 '12 at 11:05
    
I prefer the use of Where with the index parameter on the predicate here over mine.. didn't know it existed! –  Kieren Johnstone Nov 13 '12 at 11:11
var result = list
    .Zip(list.Skip(1), (l, r) => l + 1 == r)
    .All(t => t);
share|improve this answer
    
Love the Zip, clever –  Kieren Johnstone Nov 13 '12 at 11:12

Extension method:

public static bool IsConsecutive(this IEnumerable<int> myList)
{
    return myList.SequenceEqual(Enumerable.Range(myList.First(), myList.Last()));
}

Useage:

bool isConsecutive = dansRandomList.IsConsecutive();
share|improve this answer
    
not quite, you mean Min and Max I think? –  Kieren Johnstone Nov 13 '12 at 10:51
    
Well, both will work. –  davenewza Nov 13 '12 at 10:52
    
@davenewza not if the list isn't ordered –  alexw Nov 13 '12 at 10:53
    
But I understand that the list must be ordered? Values need to be "consecutive". –  davenewza Nov 13 '12 at 10:55
    
Yes but you haven't checked that it is –  alexw Nov 13 '12 at 10:59

Here is the another one. It supports {1,2,3,4} and {4,3,2,1} both. It tests sequential number differences equals 1 or -1.

Function IsConsecutive(ints As IEnumerable(Of Integer)) As Boolean
    If ints.Count > 1 Then
        Return Enumerable.Range(0, ints.Count - 1).
            All(Function(r) ints(r) + 1 = ints(r + 1) Or ints(r) - 1 = ints(r + 1))
    End If

    Return False
End Function
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It is works for unique list only.

List<Int32> dansConList = new List<Int32>();
dansConList.Add(7);
dansConList.Add(8);
dansConList.Add(9);

bool b = (dansConList.Min() + dansConList.Max())*((decimal)dansConList.Count())/2.0m == dansConList.Sum();
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Incorrect. Sum is a necessary condition, but not a sufficient one. –  CodesInChaos Nov 13 '12 at 11:19
    
@CodesInChaos Can you substantiate your statement? –  Hamlet Hakobyan Nov 13 '12 at 11:29
    
For example {1,1,4,4} –  CodesInChaos Nov 13 '12 at 11:31
    
@CodesInChaos, thanks –  Hamlet Hakobyan Nov 13 '12 at 11:33
    
New example {-1,1}, unique values, but still wrong. –  CodesInChaos Nov 13 '12 at 11:47

Here is a C version code, I think it's easy to rewrite it in other language based on the logical.

int isConsecutive(int *array, int length) {
     int i = 1;
     for (; i < length; i++) {
          if (array[i] != array[i - 1] + 1)
              return 0; //which means false and it's not a consecutive list
     }

     return 1;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is wrong answer for two reasons. First, it's C instead of C#. If the question is about C# then answer must be with C#, otherwise it's not an answer. Second, OP already has similar code in C#, but is specifically asking for code that involves LINQ, which is C# technology. –  Dialecticus Nov 13 '12 at 11:08
    
Incorrect. Checks if all elements in the list are equal, not if they're consecutive. –  CodesInChaos Nov 13 '12 at 11:25
1  
Ok, three reasons... –  Dialecticus Nov 13 '12 at 11:26

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