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We have a WCF client and we need to save the request before we send it, however after every serialization there are some leaked windows event handles. We've tried windbg but the handles are created by the clr. Using sysinternals handles.exe reveals that Semaphores and Events are constantly increasing, the unmanaged memory is also increasing:

Handle type summary:
  ALPC Port       : 10
  Desktop         : 1
  Directory       : 5
  EtwRegistration : 16
  Event           : 574
  File            : 12
  IoCompletion    : 3
  Key             : 13
  KeyedEvent      : 1
  Mutant          : 7
  Process         : 1
  Section         : 11
  Semaphore       : 467
  Thread          : 19
  Timer           : 3
  TpWorkerFactory : 16
  WindowStation   : 2
Total handles: 1161

After some testing, it seems that the behaviour occurs only on 4.0/4.5 Here is test code to demonstrate the problem:

namespace HandleLeak
{
    class Program
    {
        private static XDocument SerializeToSoap(object source)
        {
            TypedMessageConverter messageConverter = TypedMessageConverter.Create(source.GetType(), null, new XmlSerializerFormatAttribute());
            using (Message request = messageConverter.ToMessage(source, MessageVersion.Soap11))
            {
                var xdoc = new XDocument();
                using (var wr = xdoc.CreateWriter())
                {
                    request.WriteMessage(wr);
                }
                return xdoc;
            }
        }

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var sr = new SomeRequest();
            while(true)
            {
                SerializeToSoap(sr);
                GC.Collect();

                var currentProcess = Process.GetCurrentProcess();
                Console.WriteLine("Handles: {0}", currentProcess.HandleCount);
                Console.WriteLine("press any key to continue, esc to quit");
                if (Console.ReadKey(true).Key == ConsoleKey.Escape)
                    break;
            }
            Console.WriteLine("Done");
            Console.ReadKey();
        }
    }

    /// <remarks/>
    [System.CodeDom.Compiler.GeneratedCodeAttribute("svcutil", "4.0.30319.1")]
    [System.SerializableAttribute()]
    [System.Diagnostics.DebuggerStepThroughAttribute()]
    [System.ComponentModel.DesignerCategoryAttribute("code")]
    [System.Xml.Serialization.XmlTypeAttribute(Namespace = "http://test")]
    public partial class SomeType
    {

    }

    [System.Diagnostics.DebuggerStepThroughAttribute()]
    [System.CodeDom.Compiler.GeneratedCodeAttribute("System.ServiceModel", "4.0.0.0")]
    [System.ServiceModel.MessageContractAttribute(IsWrapped = false)]
    public partial class SomeRequest
    {

        [System.ServiceModel.MessageBodyMemberAttribute(Name = "someRequest", Namespace = "http://test", Order = 0)]
        public SomeType statusRequest1;

        public SomeRequest()
        {
        }

        public SomeRequest(SomeType statusRequest1)
        {
            this.statusRequest1 = statusRequest1;
        }
    }
}

The question is, are we doing something wrong, or is it a bug in the framework?

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1 Answer 1

Well, it turns out I should have googled a bit more:

http://www-jo.se/f.pfleger/memoryleak and http://plainoldstan.blogspot.ch/2011/04/wcf-memory-leak-with.html

The solution is to cache the TypedMessageConverter, who would have guessed.

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