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I'm working on some server-side code that wraps all exceptions before passing them to the client side, due to this all client facing methods have the following code

try{
   DoSomething();
} catch (ExceptionA e) {
   throw new CustomException(AType, e);
} catch (ExceptionB e) {
   throw new CustomException(BType, e);
} catch (Exception e) {
   throw new CustomException(Unexpected, e);
}

to have this repeated in every method seems to violate the DRY principle and I was wondering what the best way to refactor it would be. For instance I was thinking a wrapper method such as:

private void wrapException(Exception e) {
if (e instanceof ExceptionA) {
   throw new CustomException(AType, e);
}
etc...
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Take a look at AspectJ soften exception.

Also look at Guava's Throwables.

There is also Lamboks sneaky exception.

The other option is to use Anonymous object instances aka closures.

public abstract class Wrapper {
    public void execute() { 
        try {
            // do some boiler plate before
            this.wrap();
            // do some boiler plate after.
        } catch (ExceptionA | ExceptionB ex)  {
            Type t = determineType(ex);
            throw new CustomException(t, ex);
        }
    }
    public void abstract wrap();
}

Now in your code you do something like:

new Wrapper() {
    public void wrap() {
        DoSomething();
    }
}.execute()
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting libraries but they don't really apply to my problem. I'm looking at refactoring some boilerplate error catching preferably without external libraries. –  FooBar Nov 13 '12 at 11:50
    
Yes but you can look at how Throwables.propagate works (code wise) –  Adam Gent Nov 13 '12 at 12:19

This is possible in Java7 and up:

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/technotes/guides/language/catch-multiple.html

Copy-paste example from above doc:

catch (IOException|SQLException ex) {
    logger.log(ex);
    throw ex;
}
share|improve this answer

This is one way to go about it:

Exception caughtEx = null;
String extraInfo = null;
try{
   DoSomething();
} catch (ExceptionA e) {
   caughtEx = e;
   extraInfo = AType;
} catch (ExceptionB e) {
   caughtEx = e;
   extraInfo = BType;
} catch (Exception e) { // catching Exception is usually a bad idea, just let it bubble up without catching...
   caughtEx = e;
   extraInfo = Unexpected;
}
if (caughtEx != null) throw new CustomException(extraInfo, caughtEx);
share|improve this answer
    
This would end up being more code and less modular than it currently is. Exception catching and wrapping is important so as not to expose server side implementation to the client. –  FooBar Nov 13 '12 at 11:39
    
@FooBar In this simple example it's more code, but if the "then" block at the end is longer, or if it contains non-boilerplate code you do not want to repeat, then it starts to make sense. –  hyde Nov 13 '12 at 11:50
    
You misunderstood the question I think. The try catches are not in a single method, they are in public methods facing the client. This would still require the boilerplate to be in every method –  FooBar Nov 13 '12 at 11:54

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