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I have the following arduino code that does recursive merge sort. We have to determine how to calculate the maximum amount of array elements you can input in this 8192B SRAM. The number of array elements is set in this void setup()

int16_t Test_len = 64;

I would've love to solve this myself but was hopeless after hours and I miss this one lecture cause I had a flu.

the copy of the whole code.

#include <Arduino.h>
#include <mem_syms.h>

// some formatting routines to indent our messages to make it easier
// to trace the recursion.

uint8_t indent_pos = 0;
const uint8_t indent_amt = 2;

void indent_in() {
    if ( indent_pos <= 32 ) {
        indent_pos ++;
        }
    }

void indent_out() {
    if ( indent_pos >= indent_amt ) {
        indent_pos --;
        }
    }

void indent() {
    for (uint8_t i=0; i < indent_pos * indent_amt; i++) {
        Serial.print(" ");
        }
    }

// print out memory use info, s is a simple descriptive string
void mem_info(char *s) {
    indent();
    Serial.print(s);
    Serial.print(" Stack: ");
    Serial.print(STACK_SIZE);
    Serial.print(" Heap: ");
    Serial.print(HEAP_SIZE);
    Serial.print(" Avail: ");
    Serial.print(AVAIL_MEM);
    Serial.println();
    }

// call this after a malloc to confirm that the malloc worked, and 
// if not, display the message s and enter a hard loop

void assert_malloc_ok(void * mem_ptr, char *s) {
    if ( ! mem_ptr ) { 
        Serial.print("Malloc failed. ");
        Serial.print(s);
        Serial.println();
        while ( 1 ) { }
        }
    }

// call this on entry to a procedure to assue that at least required amt of
// memory is available in the free area between stack and heap if not, display
// the message s and enter a hard loop

void assert_free_mem_ok(uint16_t required_amt, char *s) {

    if ( AVAIL_MEM < required_amt ) { 
        Serial.print("Insufficient Free Memory: ");
        Serial.print(s);
        Serial.print(" require ");
        Serial.print(required_amt);
        Serial.print(", have ");
        Serial.print(AVAIL_MEM);
        Serial.println();
        while ( 1 ) { }
        }
    }

void merge(int16_t *Left, int16_t Left_len, int16_t *Right, int16_t Right_len, 
    int16_t *S) {

    // position of next element to be processed
    int Left_pos = 0;
    int Right_pos = 0;

    // position of next element of S to be specified
    // note: S_pos = Left_pos+Right_pos
    int S_pos = 0;

    // false, take from right, true take from left
    int pick_from_left = 0;

    while ( S_pos < Left_len + Right_len ) {

    // pick the smallest element at the head of the lists
    // move smallest of Left[Left_pos] and Right[Right_pos] to S[S_pos] 
    if ( Left_pos >= Left_len ) {
        pick_from_left = 0;
        }
    else if ( Right_pos >= Right_len ) {
        pick_from_left = 1;
        }
    else if ( Left[Left_pos] <= Right[Right_pos] ) {
        pick_from_left = 1;
        }
    else {
        pick_from_left = 0;
        }

    if ( pick_from_left ) {
        S[S_pos] = Left[Left_pos];
        Left_pos++;
        S_pos++;
        }
    else {
        S[S_pos] = Right[Right_pos];
        Right_pos++;
        S_pos++;
        }

    }
}


// sort in place, i.e. A will be reordered
void merge_sort(int16_t *A, int16_t A_len) {
    indent_in();
    indent();
    Serial.print("Entering merge sort: array addr ");
    Serial.print( (int) A );
    Serial.print(" len ");
    Serial.println( A_len);
    mem_info("");

    assert_free_mem_ok(128, "merge_sort");

    if ( A_len < 2 ) {
        indent_out();
        return;
        }

    if ( A_len == 2 ) {
        if ( A[0] > A[1] ) {
            int temp = A[0];
            A[0] = A[1];
            A[1] = temp;
            }
        indent_out();
        return;
        }

    // split A in half, sort left, sort right, then merge
    // left half is:  A[0], ..., A[split_point-1]
    // right half is: A[split_point], ..., A[A_len-1]

    int split_point = A_len / 2;

    indent();
    Serial.println("Doing left sort");

    merge_sort(A, split_point);

    mem_info("After left sort");

    indent();
    Serial.println("Doing right sort");

    merge_sort(A+split_point, A_len-split_point);

    mem_info("After right sort");

    // don't need the merging array S until this point
    int *S = (int *) malloc( A_len * sizeof(int) );// source of 10 bytes accumulation in heap

    assert_malloc_ok(S, "Cannot get merge buffer");

    mem_info("Doing merge");

    merge(A, split_point, A+split_point, A_len-split_point, S);

    for (int i=0; i < A_len; i++) {
        A[i] = S[i];
        }

    // now we are done with it
    free(S);

    mem_info("After free");
    indent_out();
    }

void setup() {
  Serial.begin(9600);

    // int *bad_news = (int *) malloc(4000);

    mem_info("********* THIS IS THE BEGINNING *********");
    randomSeed(analogRead(0));

    int16_t Test_len = 64;
    int16_t Test[Test_len];

    Serial.print("In: ");
    for (int16_t i=0; i < Test_len; i++) {
        Test[i] = random(0, 100);
if ( 1 ) {
        Serial.print(Test[i]);
        Serial.print(" ");
}
        }
    Serial.println();

    merge_sort(Test, Test_len);

if ( 1 ) {
    Serial.print("Out: ");
    for (int16_t i=0; i < Test_len; i++) {
        if ( i < Test_len-1 && Test[i] > Test[i+1] ) {
            Serial.print("Out of order!!");
            }

        Serial.print(Test[i]);
        Serial.print(" ");
        }
    Serial.println();
}
    }

void loop() {
    }
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1  
Please be specific in your questions. Are there errors in the code you have provided? If yes, give details. Are you asking for the gaps to be filled in in your code? What have you tried/thought of in terms of solving this problem yourself? –  Sheena Nov 14 '12 at 9:10
    
The number of elements of type element_t that could be placed in 8192 bytes of RAM is 8192 / sizeof( element_t ). If this does not answer your question, please be more specific in your question. –  DevSolar Nov 14 '12 at 9:51

1 Answer 1

The recursion is almost a red-herring, the maximum input array size is equal to:-

(total_memory - memory_allocated_for_other_stuff) / (2 * number_of_elements * sizeof array_element)

where total_memory is the amount of memory the system has, memory_allocated_for_other_stuff is the memory used by the program (if it's using the same memory), the stack and other data, number_of_elements is the array length and sizeof array_element is the number of bytes per element to sort.

The reason it's 2 * number_of_elements is that you need to allocate a temporary buffer to merge the two halves into, S in your code. S has an upper bound equal to the size of the array to sort since each recursive level, the required size for S halves and the temporary buffer is only allocated after the recursion has happened.

I said that the recursive nature was almost a red-herring, because the space required by S halves each recursive step so if you have the memory to do the top-most merge, there's enough to do all the recursed merges as well. But, each recursive step adds a fixed amount to the stack (assuming the stack uses the same memory as the data), so the memory_allocated_for_other_stuff is increasing linearly with number of recursive calls, i.e. the memory for the stack is:-

stack_used = stack_frame_size * (log2(number of elements) + 1)

where stack_frame_size is the memory required to create a stack frame (the bit on the stack to hold return addresses, local variables, etc... for a function). The question is: can stack_used exceed the maximum space required for S. The answer depends on the size of the stack frame. Using a spreadsheet, it looks like it's not a trivial question to answer - it depends on the size of the array to sort and the size of the stack frame, although it seems the stack frame needs to be quite large to cause problems.

So it turns out that one of the factors that determines the maximum array size you can sort, is the size of the array you're sorting!

Alternatively, you could just guess a value and see if it works, using a binary search to narrow down to a specific value.

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