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I had commited an exploratory and buggy changeset locally. The bug has been fixed in the next local commit. Now I want to push the debugged version but in a way that skips the buggy local commit. Is there a way to do this simply.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Short answer: no.

Long answer: you can leave a chain of recent commits out of a push but you can't miss out parts of the chain when you push. This is because mercurial tracks the changes you made at the point of committing and your most recent changeset probably doesn't make sense outside of the context of the buggy one.

Options:

  1. Some people would recommend using the MQ extension to avoid this problem in the future.
  2. Some people would recommend using the MQ extension to strip out both changesets and then re-commit only the fixed version. This can cause trouble, particularly if you've already shared your changesets with anyone.
  3. Some people (including me) would recommend just leaving your repository as it is and pushing both changesets. There's only shame in a buggy changeset if you don't fix it.
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That is disappointing I assumed one of the advantages of dvcs would be you can collate/choose commits to push. But thanks a lot for the tips. –  san Nov 13 '12 at 17:36

4 Some people (including me) would recommend using the MQ extension for folding two consecutive changesets into single before push

5 Some people would recommend using the histedit or colapse extension for folding two consecutive changesets into single before push

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You could try this :

  • Export the commit you want to go through as a patch
  • Re-clone your repository in a new directory
  • Apply the patch
  • Now perform the single commit to your shared repository
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yeah thanks, had thought about this one, but is sort of messy, so wanted to avoid it. –  san Nov 13 '12 at 17:38

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