Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a vector of pointers to objects. Each object stores a value and has a toString() function that returns that value as a string. I have an iterator to go through the vector and I need to extract the value of each object by calling toString(). The problem is, I can't figure out how to get the value.

This function is ultimately supposed to write the number to a file, but I'm using the cout for testing.

    void writeNumbers(vector<Integer*>& input)
    {
        ofstream write;
        write.open("Integers.txt");
        vector<Integer*>::iterator iter = input.begin();
        for (iter; iter < input.end(); iter++)
        {
            **std::cout << (*iter)->toString() << std::endl;**
        }
        write.close();

I get an Access Violation error which points me to the toString() function:

    std::string Integer::toString()
    {
        std::stringstream ss;
        ss << *(this)->value;
        return ss.str();
    }

toString() works fine whenever I don't try to access it through the iterator.

Edit: Value in toString is actually a pointer to a number.

Edit2: New writeNumbers:

void writeNumbers(vector<Integer*>& input)
{
    ofstream write;
    write.open("Integers.txt");
    vector<Integer*>::iterator iter = input.begin();
    for (iter; iter != input.end(); iter++)
    {
        std::cout << (*iter)->toString() << std::endl;
    }
    write.close();
}

Final Edit: Alright, the problem turned out to be a borked constructor that was failing to initialize a pointer properly, so I was WAY off base on where the problem actually was. :)

Integer::Integer(string input)
{
if(isNaN(input))
value = new int(atoi(input.c_str()));
}

So it should have been !isNaN, plus I fixed the problem of initializing it on bad input:

//New constructor, works 100%
Integer::Integer(string input)
{
if(!isNaN(input))
    value = new int(atoi(input.c_str()));
else
    value = new int(0);
}
share|improve this question
    
I think this code wouldn't compile, much less give an access violation. Unless you wrote int* Integer::operator->() somewhere –  Mooing Duck Nov 13 '12 at 22:45
add comment

2 Answers

Your toSting() has the issue. Change

ss <<*(this)->value;

to

ss << value;
share|improve this answer
    
This is my fault for failing to mention it, but value is actually a pointer. –  ThisIsNoZaku Nov 13 '12 at 17:28
    
Expanding on that, if I pass the pointer, it works but it of course passes the address and not the value I need. Any attempts to dereference to pass into the stringstream causes the access error. –  ThisIsNoZaku Nov 13 '12 at 20:59
add comment

EDIT: This is not an error, but a general advice when using iterators. Dont use < to check for end, use !=.

iter < input.end()

It should be like this:

iter != input.end()

This is because for certain containers, the < operator will not do what you expect. As a result, at some point you could be dereferencing input.end() itself, which points at nothing.

share|improve this answer
4  
std::vector has random access iterators. < will work just fine, although != is more idiomatic. –  Pete Becker Nov 13 '12 at 12:18
    
@PeteBecker is that really mandated by the standard, or is it implementation defined? –  Axel Nov 13 '12 at 12:20
1  
Yes, obviously, random access iterators for std::vector are mandated. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Nov 13 '12 at 12:37
1  
I think I learned something today... –  W. Goeman Nov 13 '12 at 16:16
1  
Edited the answer according to the comments. –  W. Goeman Nov 14 '12 at 8:38
show 4 more comments

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.