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I have a file 1:

1
2
3

This command prints:

$ awk 'BEGIN{system("cat " 1)}'
1
2
3

.

$ awk 'BEGIN{system( "cat '\''" 1 "'\''") }'
1
2
3

I changed the filename from "1" to "one"

I have a file one:

1
2
3

Now, the command does not work:

$ awk 'BEGIN{system("cat " one)}' 
|

.

$ awk 'BEGIN{system( "cat '\''" one "'\''") }'
cat: : No such file or directory

Why now commands do not work?

Thank you for the explanation.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

if your file name is a number, you could write the number in system() directly, awk will convert it into string value internally. you even could write expression to get the number as result. for example:

system("cat "4-3) should work for your "1" case as well. to see the difference, you could name a file as "1+1" then system("cat "1+1) won't work, it will complain that file "2" doesn't exist.

for the "one" example: the 'one' in your system() worked not like string "one" but a variable named "one". in awk, if a variable was not assigned, its default value is empty string.

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Thank you for the explanation. –  Tedee12345 Nov 13 '12 at 13:08

In your examples, awk interprets 1 as a literal 1 and one as a variable which has no value. That means system is trying to execute cat {empty} or cat ''.

Try this:

awk 'BEGIN{one = "one" ; system("cat " one)}'

or:

awk 'BEGIN{system("cat one")}'
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Thank you for the explanation. –  Tedee12345 Nov 13 '12 at 13:10

In awk, 1 has the value of 1 and the variable named one is an empty string. So "cat" 1 is the string cat 1, but "cat" one is the string cat. The string "cat '\''" one "'\''" is the string cat '', so you are passing the empty string as the first argument to cat.

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Thank you for the explanation. –  Tedee12345 Nov 13 '12 at 13:09

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