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I guess this is really simple and just involes the use of a iterator and .MoveNext() method.

But let's say you are iterating through a collection, you do some work on the collection but based on some condition in each "loop" you might have to grab 2 or more items and basically skip over them so you don't loop through them next.

Example:

foreach (Fish fish in ParcelOfFish)
{
    GiverPersonFish(fish);
}

Here I'm just iterating through a collection of Fish and passing them to a method. Some fishes are small so I have to give the person another one so it won't starve.

foreach (Fish fish in ParcelOfFish)
{
    GiverPersonFish(fish);

    if (fish.IsSmall)
    {
        GiverPersonFish(ParcelOfFish.MoveNext()); // here I want to give him the next fish
    }
}

How will this work so that the second fish I give will not iterate in next loop?

Also to make this trickier, it's unfair that a person might get a big and a small fish so whenever there is a small fish I wan't to grab another small fish from the iteration and then go on.

So if the order was

Small
Big
Big
Small
Big
Small

after first "loop" he will get two small (index 0 and 3) and it will iterate through the rest like this:

Big
Big
Big
Small

The compiler doesn't seem to like when a iteration is modified like that while iterating through it.

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As is, it seems that you give all the fishes to the same person, so what is the deal with advanced more than one fish each iteration? –  Y. Ecarri Nov 13 '12 at 12:15
    
foreach doesn't fit here. Maybe using a queue is better. –  Amiram Korach Nov 13 '12 at 12:17
    
@Y.Ecarri Well we don't really know what happens in the GivePersonFish() method and it's not really important. –  Ingó Vals Nov 13 '12 at 13:08
1  
@Y.Ecarri So you are saying that the person will only eat for one day, I Should rather TeachPersonToFish() and he will eat for a lifetime? –  Ingó Vals Nov 13 '12 at 13:21
2  
@IngóVals No, I don't have an opinion on moral principles, I just base my opinion on Object-Oriented design criteria. If some information is not relevant in the scope of the for-each loop, then it does not care for the sake of the loop iteration. You showed concern on how fishes are distributed among people so BOTH fishes and people are relevant or both are not relevant for the iteration. If you need to make an optimal distribution of fishes, try a different approach as for example, the Sum-Bottleneck algorithm or any other partitioning algorithm. –  Y. Ecarri Nov 13 '12 at 13:55

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Actually, it is solvable through the Enumerator

using (var enumerator = ParcelOfFish.GetEnumerator())
{
    // Bla bla whatever you need, but remember the first call to .MoveNext();
    if (!enumerator.MoveNext())
            break;

    // Your actions here. MoveNext() is bool and proceeds to the new item.
    // Try using while (!condition) { } here.
}
share|improve this answer

Iterations, by design, aren't meant to work like this. If you need more flexible behavior you should use a for loop.

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Instead of using a foreach loop (foreach(Foo foo in bar)), use a plain old for loop (for(int i = 0; i < bar.Length; i++)).

This will let you do something like this:

for (int i = 0; i < ParcelOfFish.Length; i++)
{
    Fish fish = ParcelOfFish[i];
    GiverPersonFish(fish);

    if (fish.IsSmall && i+1 < ParcelOfFish.Length)
    {
        GiverPersonFish(ParcelOfFish[++i]); // give him the next fish
    }
}

Using a for loop will also let you look through your list for another small fish, give it to the person, and remove it from the list (this time assuming ParcelOfFish is a list, not an array):

for (int i = 0; i < ParcelOfFish.Count; i++)
{
    Fish fish = ParcelOfFish[i];
    GiverPersonFish(fish);

    if (fish.IsSmall)
    {
        for (int j = i+1; j < ParcelOfFish.Count; j++)
        {
            Fish fish2 = ParcelOfFish[j];
            if (fish2.IsSmall)
            {
                GiverPersonFish(fish2); // give him the next small fish
                ParcelOfFish.RemoveAt(j);
                break;                    
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
This also will not give next small fish –  Sergey Berezovskiy Nov 13 '12 at 12:22
    
I answered the first part of the question, and indicated how to solve the rest of the problem, but I've added an example for the second part too. –  cmrn Nov 13 '12 at 12:33

I'd use a queue instead.

var queue = new Queue<Fish>(ParcelOfFish);
while (queue.Count > 0)
{
    var fish = queue.Dequeue();

    if (fish.IsSmall && queue.Count > 0) 
    {
        var fish2 = queue.Dequeue();

        if (fish2.IsSmall)
            GiverPersonFish(fish); // give them the first small fish
        else
            queue.Enqueue(fish); // throw it back to the end of the queue

        GiverPersonFish(fish2);
    }
    else
        GiverPersonFish(fish);
}

Also works with a stack.

share|improve this answer
    
queue.Count > 0 is better than queue.Any() since that is an extension which enumerates the collection. –  AgentFire Nov 21 '12 at 16:52
    
@AgentFire That's true! Edited. –  Cameron MacFarland Nov 21 '12 at 23:39

Try

Enumerator<Fish> enumerator = ParcelOfFish.GetEnumerator();
Queue<Fish> bigFishCache = new Queue<Fish>(){ };
Boolean smallFishSwitch = false;

while(enumerator.MoveNext())
{
    if(smallFishSwitch)
    {
        if(enumerator.Current == BigFish)
        {
             bigFishCache.Enqueue(enumerator.Current);
        }
        else
        {
             smallFishSwitch = false;
             GivePersonFish(enumerator.Current);
             ForEach(Fish fish in bigFishCache)
             {
                  GivePersonFish(fish);
             }
             bigFishCache.Clear();
        }
    }
    else
    {
        smallFishSwitch = enumerator.Current == SmallFish;
        GivePersonFish(enumerator.Current);
    }    
}
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