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I have read that one must not store std::auto_ptr in std::vector and that boost::ptr_vector could be used instead. I have been able to do so, I don't know however how to use ptr_vector, when I don't want to store pointers, but a struct, which has a pointer member.

In this example, I want to open some files and store the associated ofstream object with some additional data, for later use. I would like to replace the file field of struct data with a smart pointer. Since the vector<data> v should be the owner, I think that a shared_ptr would work, but wouldn't be appropriate.

What should I replace the naked pointer file with?

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <vector>

struct data {
  std::string filename;
  std::ofstream* file;

  data(const std::string filename, std::ofstream* file)
    : filename(filename), file(file)
  {
  }
};

std::vector<data> open_files()
{
  std::vector<data> v;
  v.push_back(data("foo", new std::ofstream("foo")));
  return v;
}

int main()
{
  std::vector<data> v = open_files();

  /* use the files */
  *(v[0].file) << "foo";

  delete v[0].file;  // either rely on dtor to close(), or call it manually
}

Update: I feel I have done a sub optimal job in describing my problem, let me try with another example. Also I am looking for a C++03 solution:

#include <memory>
#include <vector>
#include <boost/ptr_container/ptr_vector.hpp>

struct T {
  std::auto_ptr<int> a;
};

int main()
{
  // instead of
  // std::vector<std::auto_ptr<int> > v;
  // use
  boost::ptr_vector<int> v;

  // what to use instead of
  // std::vector<T> w;
}
share|improve this question
    
Do whatever cleanup is necessary in data's destructor. Since the vector doesn't hold pointers, you have to take no action. If data's destructor is correct, everything will take care of itself. –  juanchopanza Nov 13 '12 at 13:02
    
Why do you need a (deprecated) auto_ptr? Use boost::shared_ptr<int> which is copyable. It will be owned by the vector and destroyed when the vector leaves scope. –  Marcel Nov 13 '12 at 14:12
1  
auto_ptr models unique ownership, whereas shared_ptr has a different meaning of shared ownership. I would use unique_ptr if I would have access to C++11. However using share_ptr is probably still better than my version. –  Micha Wiedenmann Nov 13 '12 at 14:27
    
shared_ptr is reference counting so doesn't have ownership semantics. Its the copying ability that you need in order to store in a vector. Reference counting is an added bonus because you won't need to worry about deletion either. –  Marcel Nov 13 '12 at 14:48
    
As std::ofstream does not support copying, and std::vector is allowed to copy its contents around, your safest bet is to use boost::shared_ptr<std::ofstream>, even though it does not model the ownership semantics you want. –  Bart van Ingen Schenau Nov 13 '12 at 16:35
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Concerning your data class, I would suggest using an std::unique_ptr<std::ofstream>. This is not to save you from an accidental memory leak, since you are deleting the pointer in the constructor, but rather to make the ownership explicit. A user of your code would have to know what data is doing with the pointer it takes in the constructor:

std::ofstream ofs;
{
   data d1("crash", &ofs);
} // error! d1 will attempt to delete stack allocated object

std::ofstream* pOfs = new std::ofstream(....);
data d2("crash again", pOfs);
delete pOFs; // user thinks data makes a deep copy

However, with unique_ptr the intend is clear, hence it is harder to make mistakes:

data d3("OK", std::unique_ptr<std::ofstream>(new std::ofstream(....)));

std::unique_ptr<std::ofstream> pOfs2(new std::ofstream(....));
data d4("OK", pOfs2); // safe, pOfs's contents have been safely moved

// we can check pOfs2 after the move
if (pOfs2) { /*  */ } 
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. Do you have a proposal for C++98 too? –  Micha Wiedenmann Nov 13 '12 at 13:43
    
@MichaWiedenmann Unfortuately, there isn't a completely satisfying alternative, but you could use an std::auto_ptr. You would have to keep it private and avoid copying it. You should make sure you understand the pitfalls –  juanchopanza Nov 13 '12 at 13:51
    
Since I plan to put the enclosing class into a vector, (and if unique_ptr is not available) I prefer shared_ptr, even though it has different semantics. –  Micha Wiedenmann Nov 15 '12 at 7:07
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You can delete pointer in destructor:

struct data 
{
  std::string filename;
  std::ofstream* file;

  data(const std::string filename, std::ofstream* file)
    : filename(filename), file(file)
  {
  }
  ~data()
  {
     delete file;
  }
};

Or use std::unique_ptr to wrap that pointer but its unnecessary in your case.

share|improve this answer
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You don't need to have an ofstream* as a member.

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <vector>

struct data {
  std::string filename;
  data(const std::string filename) : filename(filename)
  {}
};

std::vector<data> open_files()
{
  std::vector<data> v;
  v.push_back(data("foo"));
  return v;
}

If you want to append to the file, specify the app file mode.

void print_files(const std::vector<data>& v)
{
    for(std::vector<data>::const_iterator it = v.begin(); it != v.end(); ++it)
    {
        std::ofstream os(it->filename, std::ostream::app);
        os << "bar";
    }
}

int main()
{
  std::vector<data> v = open_files();

    print_files(v);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I will write multiple times to different files and have therefore opend all the files in advance. –  Micha Wiedenmann Nov 13 '12 at 14:24
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