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We have a shopping cart as pictured below, The setup works well, except for one fatal flaw. If you place an order the order is linked to a product, so If I update the product after you have purchased the product there is no way for me to show you want the product looked like when you bought it (including price). This means we need versioning.

Current Schema

My plan at present is to, when a new product, or variant is created, or an existing one is edited, create a duplicate of the product or variant in the database. When a purchase is made, link the order to the version, not the product.

This seems rather simple, except from what I can see the only things we don't need to version are the categories (as no one cares what categories it was in.). So we need to version:

  • Products
  • Variants
  • The key -> value pairs of attributes for each version
  • The images

My current thinking is,

note: When a product is created a default variant is created as well, this cannot be removed.

  • When a product is created
    • Insert the product into the products table.
    • Create the default variant
    • Duplicate the product into the products_versions table
      • Replace current id column with a product_id column
      • Add id column
    • Duplicate the variant into the variants_versions table
      • Replace current id column with variant_id column
      • Add id column
      • Replace product_id column with product_version_id column

  • When a product is edited
    • Update the product into the products table.
    • Duplicate the product into the products_versions table
      • Replace current id column with a product_id column
      • Add id column
    • Duplicate all product variants into the variants_versions table
      • Replace current id column with variant_id column
      • Add id column
      • Replace product_id column with product_version_id column
    • Duplicate all variant_image_links into the variant_Image_link_version table
      • Replace current variant_id column with variant_version_id column

  • When a variant is added
    • Add the variant into the variants table.
    • Duplicate the product into the products_versions table
      • Replace current id column with a product_id column
      • Add id column
    • Duplicate all product variants into the variants_versions table
      • Replace current id column with variant_id column
      • Add id column
      • Replace product_id column with product_version_id column

  • When a variant is edited
    • Update the variant in the variants table.
    • Duplicate the product into the products_versions table
      • Replace current id column with a product_id column
      • Add id column
    • Duplicate all product variants into the variants_versions table
      • Replace current id column with variant_id column
      • Add id column
      • Replace product_id column with product_version_id column
    • Duplicate all variant_image_links into the variant_Image_link_version table
      • Replace current variant_id column with variant_version_id column

So the final structure looks like Full Size

Now this all seems great, except it seems like a heck of a lot of duplicated data, e.g. if we update a product we duplicate the variants even though they would not have been updated since they were inserted. Also, this seems like a lot of work.

Is there a better way of doing this?

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What program did you use to draw those diagrams ? I like how it looks. –  Radu Murzea Nov 13 '12 at 13:03
1  
@SoboLAN dbdsgnr.appspot.com –  Hailwood Nov 13 '12 at 13:06
    
+1 for the dbdsgnr.appspot.com info and +1 for the question. I'm surprised that this hasn't been covered in a "standard database models" book. If it has, I'd like to know which one. Can't recall the other book which is a massive collection of known/required models for different industry fields. –  aneroid Nov 16 '12 at 5:09
    
This the book I was referring to: The Data Model Resource Book - Len Silverston. But it doesn't cover generic data versioning. –  aneroid Nov 16 '12 at 5:20

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can do what ERP (and also possibly Payroll) systems do: Add a Start and End Date/Time. So...

  • the variant and prices match with their product based on the common dates.
  • all queries default to running on current date and the joins between each table need to also take into account the overlapping/intersecting date ranges. parent_start_date <= child_start_date AND parent_end_date >= child_end_date
  • You would end up with duplicated rows for each price change or variant but you then don't need to keep update as many records (like variant ids) when the product price changes.
  • Need to ensure valid dates are used. PS: Use your system's max date for the End datetime of the most current/recent record.

Btw, some related questions along the same line:

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This sounds like a good idea, so lets see if I can break this down in the comments below, let me know if anything seems wrong. –  Hailwood Nov 15 '12 at 20:01
    
New Product Created Add a product into the products table, Fill in a start date, leave end date null, the same with the default variant in the variants table. –  Hailwood Nov 15 '12 at 20:02
    
Product Edited UPDATE products SET end_date = NOW() WHERE id={id} AND end_date IS NULL the insert the new product, leaving the end_date null. –  Hailwood Nov 15 '12 at 20:04
    
Variant Edited UPDATE products SET end_date = NOW() WHERE id={id} AND end_date IS NULL UPDATE variants SET end_date = NOW() WHERE id={id} AND end_date IS NULL Insert edited variant as new row, setting the start date and leaving the end_date null, insert duplicate product, setting start_date –  Hailwood Nov 15 '12 at 20:15
    
Variant Added UPDATE products SET end_date = NOW() WHERE id={id} AND end_date IS NULL Insert new variant as new row. Insert duplicate product setting start_date –  Hailwood Nov 15 '12 at 20:16

Only need to talk about one table for this concept. Replicate to others as needed. Keep just one products table. add a version # and maybe an isActive. for every product only one is active so fetch the active ones. when u make an update on a product, let's say product ABC has versions 1 to 6. only 6 isActive. So your update would get the max of version for ABC, return 6, update that row for version 6 to be isActive=false, and do an insert of the new isActive=true version 7. When the user buys something he or she is will have that version # stamped out in their order.

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That sounds like exactly what I am doing above, except keeping it all in one table, still the same amount of data duplication though... –  Hailwood Nov 13 '12 at 13:08
    
Correct but it is all in one spot. Less to maintain. You should also add an updated_by_username and updt_date column for an audit. –  Drew Pierce Nov 13 '12 at 13:09
    
It doesn't really seem less to maintain to me, and it seems like a bad idea, doing that your tables are going to get HUGE! so an user viewing the shopping cart on the front end (I.E when heading to buy the product) their select queries are going to take longer as you are dealing with much bigger tables. but good point on the extra columns. –  Hailwood Nov 13 '12 at 13:12
    
I did not see in your question anything about sizes of tables. Did I miss something? –  Drew Pierce Nov 13 '12 at 13:13
    
Well, no, that's not in my question, but it's common sense that you would want to keep your tables to contain as little information as possible is it not? (Please don't take my comments as negative btw, Appreciate any answers, just pointing out possible flaws in the answer!) –  Hailwood Nov 13 '12 at 13:16

Another approach to this would be to never edit or remove your data, only create new data. In SQL terms, the only operations you ever run on your tables are INSERTs and SELECTs.

To accomplish what you want, each table would need the following colums:

  • version_id - this would be your primary key
  • id - this would be the thing that holds versions of your object together (e.g. to find all versions of a product, SELECT * FROM products WHERE id = ?)
  • creation_date
  • is_active - you're not deleting anything, so you need to flag to (logically) get rid of data

With this, here's what your products table would look like:

CREATE TABLE products (
  version_id CHAR(8) NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY,
  id INTEGER NOT NULL,
  creation_date TIMESTAMP NOT NULL DEFAULT NOW(),
  is_active BOOLEAN DEFAULT true,
  name VARCHAR(1024) NOT NULL,
  price INTEGER NOT NULL
);

CREATE TABLE variants (
  version_id CHAR(8) NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY,
  id INTEGER NOT NULL,
  creation_date TIMESTAMP NOT NULL DEFAULT NOW(),
  is_active BOOLEAN DEFAULT true,
  product_version_id CHAR(8) NOT NULL,
  price INTEGER NOT NULL,
  override_price INTEGER NOT NULL,
  FOREIGN KEY (product_version_id) REFERENCES products(version_id)
);

Now, to insert into either table

  1. Generate a unique version_id (there are several strategies for this, one is to use a database sequence, or for MySQL use ant AUTO_INCREMENT).
  2. Generate an id. This id is consistent for all versions of a product.

To update a row in a table, one must insert the entire graph e.g. to update a product, one must insert a new product, and new variants. (There is a lot of room for optimization here, but it's easiest to start with the un-optimized solution.)

For example, to update a product

  1. Generate a unique version_id
  2. Use the same id
  3. Insert new product variants. The variants will be the same as the ones linked to the previous version of the product that you're "updating", except the product_version_id will be different.

This principal can extend to all your tables.

To find the most recent version of a product, you need to use the creation_date column to get the product that was most recently created.

This model will use more space, but I think this may be a fair trade-off given it's simplicity: there are only INSERTs and SELECTs and data is never mutated.

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Isn't that similar to the answer by drew-pierce? Also, in your example data still gets mutated because you still have to update the is_active field. To be honest, I don't think there's anything wrong with the approach and sometimes a "creation_date" with an is_active flag + version_number is easier to trace. –  aneroid Nov 16 '12 at 5:00
    
Yes, it is similar, but not the same. My solution has no updates. Data is not mutated. Why do you think the is_active field would need to be mutated? –  three-cups Nov 16 '12 at 19:01
    
To be clear, the is_active field is meant to allow a product to be logically deleted from the catalog. One could add another field is_this_the_most_recent_version. That field would be mutated. Maybe this is where the confusion lies? –  three-cups Nov 16 '12 at 19:02
    
Yes was confused about that part. But then in your model, the is_this_the_most_recent_version shouldn't be required - either max id or creation date should be enough. –  aneroid Nov 17 '12 at 7:19
    
Correct, is_this_the_most_recent_version is an unnecessary optimization. –  three-cups Nov 18 '12 at 0:51

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