Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I play around with template specialization and SFINAE.

As for the following example, the things seems easy:

    template <class T>
    void Do(T t, typename std::enable_if<std::is_integral<T>::value >::type* = 0)
    {
        cout << "is integer" << endl;
    }

    template <class T>
    void Do(T t, typename std::enable_if<std::is_floating_point<T>::value >::type* = 0)
    {
        cout << "is float" << endl;
    }

No I tried std::is_array, but the specialization with std::is_array is never used.

So I tried out why is_array never matches:

    template <int num>
    void Do( int a[num])
    {
        cout << "int array size " << num << endl;
    }

    void Do( int* x)
    {
        cout << "int*" << endl;
    }

    ...
    int e[] = { 1,2,3 };
    Do(e);
    ...

The first mystery for me is, that the specialization with "int a[num]" did never catch! The function parameter always has the type int*.

If I use reference types I got the "correct" result:

    template <int num>
    void Do( int (&a)[num])
    {
        cout << "int array size " << num << endl;
    }

    void Do( int* &x)
    {
        cout << "int*" << endl;
    }

So my question comes up: Is there a reasonable usage of std::is_array in combination with template function parameters? I know that

    cout << boolalpha << std::is_array<decltype(e)>::value << endl;

will give me the correct result. But declaring the template selection manually gives me no functional add on. I there any way to detect (with or without SFINAE) that an template specialization from function parameters fits to an array?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think you got it yourself - pass arrays to template functions by reference, if you want to use their type in the secialization.

The reason you want to do this is array-to-pointer decay, which is one of the few implicit conversions that happen to template function arguments before they are matched to the parameter types. That's why T was a pointer when you tried to check that it is an array type in DoIt. However, array-to-pointer decay does not happen when the target type is reference type. So, to sum up:

template <class T>
void Do(T& t, typename std::enable_if<std::is_array<T>::value >::type* = 0)

should work.

BTW the boring way of not using SFINAE

template <class T, unsigned N>
void Do(T (&t)[N])

works too.

share|improve this answer
    
+1, but in C++11 you should use universal references: void Do(T &&t, ...) –  ecatmur Nov 13 '12 at 13:07
    
@ecatmur: maybe, but does it have any advantage for arrays? There isn't gonna be a non-copyable but movable array rvalue, is it? –  jpalecek Nov 13 '12 at 13:19
    
You can create an array xvalue by accessing an array member on a temporary: struct S { int a[3]; }; S{}.a;. –  ecatmur Nov 13 '12 at 13:36

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.