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I have a QMainWindow having various widgets, loaded with loadUI. One of those widgets is a QGroupBox which is empty at start (No layout either). I also have a custom widget (CustomWidgetContainer) that creates various widgets (CustomWidget) within itself. How many and which is determined at runtime.

The problem is that CustomWidgetContainer has its own layout to add its widgets to. But when the CustomWidgetContainer gets added to the QMainWindow, the layout is replaced with the parenting layout of the QMainWindow (which is expected and documented behaviour).

But when this CustomWidgetContainer needs its own layout (self.layout()) to add additional CustomWidgets to or to remove all the CustomWidgets, self.layout() returns None.

I can imagine all kind of workaround checking to see if the parent already has a layout (use that one, set one in the parent etc) and such. But I don't want to do anything with my parent (QMainWindow) from my child (CustomWidgetContainer) class as I consider this bad practice.

Snippets: ScalarInputEdit == CustomWidget, InputsWidget == CustomWidgetContainer

class MainWindow(qt.QMainWindow):
    ....
    def connect(self, host, port):
        self._client = PymotClient(host, port)
        self.client.connect()        
        self._set_enabled_connected()
        self.log.info("Connected to %s:%d", host, port)

        self._inputswidget = InputsWidget(self, self.client)
        print "Layout Before:", self._inputswidget.layout()
        self.inputsBox.setLayout(self._inputswidget.layout())
        print "Layout After:", self._inputswidget.layout()
        self._inputswidget.append_inputs_from_client()

class InputsWidget(qt.QWidget):
    def __init__(self, parent, client):
        super(InputsWidget, self).__init__(parent)
        ....
        self.setLayout(qt.QGridLayout())

    def append_inputs_from_client(self):
        for inp in some_list:
           self.append_input(inp)

    def append_input(self, pbo):
        self.layout().addWidget(ScalarInputEdit(self, self.client, pbo))

    def remove_all_inputs(self):
        for child in self.layout().children():
            child.deleteLater()

Output:

Layout Before: <PyQt4.QtGui.QGridLayout object at 0x8880ecc> 
Layout After: None
Exception: 
  File    "...inputwidgets.py", line 134, in append_input
    self.layout().addWidget(ScalarInputEdit(self, self.client, pbo))
AttributeError: 'NoneType' object has no attribute 'addWidget'

What is standard/good practice to do this? It's seems quite common for me to need your layout() in some later stage (after __ init__). But as some usage cases seem to replace MY layout, or worse even remove it, how can I be sure of a layout to add/remove to/from?

share|improve this question

Quote:

when the CustomWidgetContainer gets added to the QMainWindow, the layout is
replaced with the parenting layout of the QMainWindow (which is expected and
documented behaviour).

This is very unclear to me: what documented behaviour are you referring to?

self._inputswidget = InputsWidget(self, self.client)
print "Layout Before:", self._inputswidget.layout()
self.inputsBox.setLayout(self._inputswidget.layout())

Why are you setting the layout of inputsBox to the layout of _inputswidget?

print "Layout After:", self._inputswidget.layout()

The layout of _inputswidget will quite naturally be None now, because you have just transferred it to inputsBox.

self._inputswidget.append_inputs_from_client()

Obviously, this can't work, because you took away the layout of _inputswidget, and didn't replace it.

share|improve this answer
    
The documented behaviour Im referring to is this: doc.qt.digia.com/qt/qwidget.html#setLayout "If layout is the layout manger on a different widget, setLayout() will reparent the layout and make it the layout manager for this widget." I now get why it gets replaced (because I use setLayout). But what other ways do I have to make my InputsWidgets be the content of _inputsBox? Or, in general, what is the 'best practice' to do exactly this? I've spend a lot of time trying to get this to work differently. Mostly ending up with an unrendered InputsWidget (plain grey _inputsBox) – knifter Nov 14 '12 at 9:39
    
@knifter. What is the purpose of the intermediate class InputsWidget? Why don't you just delegate to inputsBox, or simply add widgets to it directly using a function? – ekhumoro Nov 14 '12 at 18:00
    
The intent was that InputsWidget would draw a composite widget (several editboxes and some knobs f.e.) without an actual border. The caller would then decide on what layout to render the widget. However, the only solution that works is by let'n the inputsBox be a part of InputsWidget. So InputsWidget has a layout w/t widgets. That layout is assigned to a groupbox. Then a 'disposable' layout is added around the groupbox. The groupbox's border can be rendered invisible. This kind of a workaround, but works. It just kind-of looks ugly and I'm still interested how others do this. – knifter Nov 15 '12 at 16:43

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