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I am writing a bash script that connects to a server, exports data to a .csv file and then runs a jar that uses that newly created file. The problem is, the jar requires the file name to include the value of the Timestamp column of the first row in the .csv file.

Here is the first line of my .csv file. In this case, the timestamp is 2012-11-01 located at the end of the row.

"####<Nov 1, 2012 12:00:01 AM UTC> <Warning> <AesoRMQAdapter::RabbitMQAdapter> <> <myServer> <[ACTIVE] ExecuteThread: '7' for queue: 'weblogic.kernel.Default (self-tuning)'> <> <> <> <1351728001726> <BEA-000000> <DEBUG SEND MESSAGE={"Volume":55.1,"OfferedVolume":54.8,"ArmedVolume":0.0,"Status":false,"BlockNr":0,"Timestamp":"2012-11-01T00:00:01+0000"}> "

My question is as followed.

How can I, after retrieving the .csv file...

  1. Grab the first timestamp from the first row in the .csv file
  2. Use that timestamp in a filename that I'll be saving the .csv file under

I appreciate all of your help!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use head -1 to get only one line from your input file, then grep -o to retrieve all timestamps in this line then head -1 to keep only the first one.

$ date=`cat myfile.csv | head -1 | grep -o -e "[0-9]\{4\}-[0-9]\{2\}-[0-9]\{2\}" | head -1`
$ echo $date
2012-11-01
$ mv myfile.csv myfile.$date.csv
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For instance, with GNU grep:

ts=$(grep -Pom1 '(?<="Timestamp":")[^"]*' csv)

or with sed:

ts=$(sed -n '1s/.*"Timestamp":"\([^"]*\).*/\1/p' csv)

Then you can do

mv csv "$ts.txt"

where csv is the old name, and 2012-11-01T00:00:01+0000.txt will be the new name.

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Will not work if there are two timestamps in the same line. echo '"Timestamp":"2012-10-12" "Timestamp":"2012-10-13"' | grep -Pom1 '(?<="Timestamp":")[^"]*' –  jvivenot Nov 13 '12 at 13:29
1  
@jvivenot Only if both will be preceded with "Timestamp":. This possibility is not mentioned in the question. If this is possible, I'd ask the OP to confirm it. Anyway, in this case the sed version will return the last match, and the grep command can be piped to tail -1 to get the last match as well. To get the first match, just add 1 at the end of sed command (1s/.../.../1p) or use head -1 with grep. –  Lev Levitsky Nov 13 '12 at 13:32

awk oneliner to do it in one shot:

awk -F':"' 'NR==1{split($NF,t,"T");print "mv "FILENAME" "t[1]".csv"}' file.csv

this will print the "mv" command line. if you want to execute it, just pipe the output to sh like:

awk ..... |sh

test:

kent$  cat dummy.csv 
"####<Nov 1, 2012 12:00:01 AM UTC> <Warning> <AesoRMQAdapter::RabbitMQAdapter> <> <myServer> <[ACTIVE] ExecuteThread: '7' for queue: 'weblogic.kernel.Default (self-tuning)'> <> <> <> <1351728001726> <BEA-000000> <DEBUG SEND MESSAGE={"Volume":55.1,"OfferedVolume":54.8,"ArmedVolume":0.0,"Status":false,"BlockNr":0,"Timestamp":"2012-11-01T00:00:01+0000"}> "
foo;bar;blah

kent$  awk -F':"' 'NR==1{split($NF,t,"T");print "mv "FILENAME" "t[1]".csv"}' dummy.csv
mv dummy.csv 2012-11-01.csv
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This will fail if there are special characters in the filename. –  ghoti Nov 13 '12 at 13:41

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