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I assume that an object representing something, you can only have one instance in memory. I avoid having duplicate and equals objects.

  1. Suppose an object uniquely identified by "New York" of type City, contained in a cache (which extends System.Runtime.Caching.ObjectCache). This object is referenced by another object called MyBusinessObject

  2. The cache removes the "New York" object but, the object MyBusinessObject still refers to "New York". The garbage collector does not remove this object from the memory because still has references.

  3. Another object requests "New York" from the cache. The cache loads the new instance of City for "New York"

Now there are two instances of "New York", one that MyBusinessObject is referencing (which is invalidated) and the new instance of "New York" which the cache is referencing.

Is there a design pattern that gives a solution to this problem? I don't want MyBusinessObject to use stale instances of City.

One possible solution would not eliminate the cache objects being referenced but, how to do this?

Here are the UML diagrams for what I'm trying to explain above:

Class diagram UML

Objects diagram

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1  
Perhaps using WeakReference would be a possible solution here. –  Magnus Nov 13 '12 at 13:53
    
A weakReference between "bo" and "NewYork"? But if I send message getCity to "bo" object, the result is NULL. That way I lose the relationship between "bo" and "New York", is not it? Thank you! –  enagra Nov 13 '12 at 17:53
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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In this case, your cache shouldn't cache the actual object, but rather, a wrapper around the object being cached that also contains information about the state of the object in the cache.

For example, you could have a simple class like so, representing the items in your cache:

public class CacheItem<T>
{
    // Since the cache is the only thing
    // that should be making CacheItems,
    // make this internal to the assembly
    // that the cache is implemented in.
    // This constructor is called before
    // an add.
    internal CacheItem(T item)
    {
        // Set the property values.
        Item = item;
    }

    // Poor-man's immutability.
    public T Item { get; private set; }

    // The backing field for IsCached, it
    // is volatile so that it can serialize
    // access for single reads/writes, which is
    // what the property does.
    // Assume it is being added when constructed.
    private volatile bool _isCached = true;

    // Only able to be set by the cache.
    // The setter is set to false when the item
    // is stale (not in the cache any longer).
    public bool IsCached 
    {
        get { return _isCached; }
        set { _isCached = value; } 
    }
}

The idea here is simple:

  • When your cache is about to enter a new instance of an item into the cache, then it calls the constructor (the constructor should only be available to the cache, if necessary, you can make CacheItem a nested class with a private constructor instead of internal) which sets the IsCached property value to true. The item is then placed in the cache.

  • When the item expires from the cache, then the cache sets the IsCached property to false (again, this property should only be accessible by the cache).

  • The responsibility is moved to the client to check the CacheItem<T> to see if it is stale.

Note that this is a pull operation. If you want, you could add push operation support by adding an event to the CacheItem<T> like so:

public class CacheItem<T>
{
    // Since the cache is the only thing
    // that should be making CacheItems,
    // make this internal to the assembly
    // that the cache is implemented in.
    // This constructor is called before
    // an add.
    internal CacheItem(T item)
    {
        // Set the property values.
        Item = item;
    }

    // Poor-man's immutability.
    public T Item { get; private set; }

    // The lock for the event registrations.
    // Since everything else is immutable, this needs
    // to be as well.
    private readonly object _eventLock = new object();

    // The backing field for the Expired
    // event.  Since everything else is immutable
    // this needs to be as well.
    private readonly EventHandler _expiredHandlers;

    // The expires event.
    public event EventHandler Expired
    {
        add { lock (_eventLock) _expiredHandlers += value; }
        remove { lock (_eventLock) _expiredHandlers -= value; }
    }

    // The backing field for IsCached, it
    // is volatile so that it can serialize
    // access for single reads/writes, which is
    // what the property does.
    // Assume it is being added when constructed.
    private volatile bool _isCached = true;        

    // The setter is set to false by the 
    // Expire method (called by the cached)
    // when the item is stale 
    // (not in the cache any longer).
    public bool IsCached { get { return _isCached; } }

    // Called internally by the cache.
    internal void Expire()
    {
        // Set _isCached to false.
        _isCached = false;

        // Get the event handlers and fire
        // the event.  Getting the handlers
        // needs to be synchronized.
        EventHandler handlers;

        // Synchronize.
        lock (_eventLock) handlers = _expiredHandlers;

        // Fire if there are handlers.
        if (handlers != null) handlers(this, EventArgs.Empty);
    }
}

Now, you can have your clients subscribe to the Expired event, which would indicate to clients when the cache item is invalidated. This is fired by the cache by calling the internal Expire event on the item when it is removed from the cache (and it will set the IsCached property to false as well).

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Thank you! A item cache for encapsulate is very useful, at any rate, I'm sorry if I've understood correctly but, the ItemCache will dispose or finalize when the cache expires it. Why set a property? I put the item in cache using a CacheItemPolicy timeout. When time is completed, cache items are finalizing. –  enagra Nov 15 '12 at 12:27
1  
@enagra No, that is not correct. When the cache is done with an object, it releases the reference, but as you've indicated that MyBusinessObject is still holding onto the reference, so garbage collection won't work here. Finalization happens when GC takes place, not when you release items from the cache. Note, if you want a pull operation, you can use a WeakReference to do the same thing as the first iteration, but if you want to be notified when the cache changes, then the second option is what you need. –  casperOne Nov 15 '12 at 13:35
    
I understand. I thought "bo" should continue to refer to the "actual" obtect, instead of referencing to CacheItem. Really, you are suggesting a particular pattern implementation of "Proxy" which I think may help. –  enagra Nov 16 '12 at 8:22
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