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I read the excellent answer explaining how to use the Dispose pattern, and also why it works that way.

Proper use of the IDisposable interface

The post clearly states that you would want to use the Dispose pattern in two different scenarios:

  1. get rid of unmanaged resources (because we have to)
  2. get rid of managed resources (because we want to be helpful)

My question is:

  • When an object is subscribed to an external event for its entire lifetime, is it also common/good practice to unregister from that event in the Dispose method? Would you implement the IDisposable interface for that purpose?
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6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Yes, you should.

This is the best way to indicate to consumers of your class that it has "resources" that must be released. (even though event subscriptions are technically not resources)

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So, should he unsubscribe from within Dispose(), and why? –  John Saunders Nov 13 '12 at 14:28
    
Would the GC eventually unregistered to the event? –  Blam Nov 13 '12 at 14:29
3  
@Blam: Of course not. Events are regular references; the GC never mucks with references. –  SLaks Nov 13 '12 at 14:31
3  
Note that you wouldn't need to do this unless the owner of the event will outlive the disposable object by a (potentially) significant amount of time. If they both go out of scope at the same time there's no need to unwire all of the events. –  Servy Nov 13 '12 at 16:08

In many (most?) cases, an object will become eligible for garbage collection very soon after Dispose is called. For example, this will always be true for IDisposable objects instantiated with a using statement:

using(var myDisposableObject = ...)
{
    ...
} // myDisposableObject.Dispose() called here

// myDisposableObject is no longer reachable and hence eligible for garbage collection here

In this situation, I personally wouldn't clutter the code with removal of event subscriptions in the general case.

For example, an ASP.NET Page or UserControl is IDisposable, and often handles events from other controls on the web page. There is no need to remove these event subscriptions when the Page or UserControl is disposed, and in fact I've never seen an ASP.NET application where this is done.

UPDATE

Other answerers suggest you should always unsubscribe to events in the Dispose method of an IDisposable class.

I disagree with this in the general case, though there may be application-specific situations where it is appropriate.

The logical conclusion is that any class that subscribes to events should be IDisposable, so that it can unsubscribe deterministically - I see no logical reason why this recommendation should only apply to classes that happen to own unmanaged resources. I don't think this is a good general recommendation for the following reasons:

  • Making a class IDisposable just so it can unsubscribe from events adds complexity for users of the class.

  • Unsubscribing from events in the Dispose method requires the developer to keep a track of event subscriptions that need to be removed - somewhat fragile as it's easy to miss one (or for a maintenance developer to add one).

  • In situations where a class subscribes to events from a long-lived publisher, it is probably more appropriate to use a Weak Event Pattern to ensure that the subscriber's lifetime is not affected by the event subscription.

  • In many situations (e.g. an ASP.NET Page class subscribing to events from its child controls), the lifetime of publisher and subscriber are closely related, so there is no need to unsubscribe.

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This is incorrect. If myDisposableObject subscribes to an event publisher, then the event publisher will hold a reference to the event subscriber even after Dispose has been called. The disposed object will continue to handle events from the event publisher, potentially causing exceptions (since the resources have been released) or at least wasting resources. –  JDB Nov 13 '12 at 15:30
    
I've posted an example to prove this: stackoverflow.com/a/13363311/211627 –  JDB Nov 13 '12 at 15:33
    
@Cyborgx37 - I'm aware that events will continue to be handled, but this is not necessarily a problem in the general case - the handler can simply ignore the events if it knows it has already been disposed. I would only unhook the events if the publisher is expected to have a longer lifetime than the subscriber. –  Joe Nov 13 '12 at 16:51
    
My point is that your comment ("myDisposableObject is no longer reachable and hence eligible for garbage collection here") is incorrect. It will be reachable and will not be eligible for garbage collection if it subscribed to an event. As it clearly has a shorter lifespan than a page or control (by virtue of the using statement), it'd be more important than average for it to unregister its event handlers. –  JDB Nov 13 '12 at 20:42
    
@Cyborgx37, see update. –  Joe Nov 14 '12 at 8:10

I prefer to have a two-pronged approach:

(1) An explicit method to UnregisterFromExternalEvents();

(2) A call in Dispose() to that method.

This way any code that controls instances of your class can either explicitly unregister, or trust on Dispose to properly dispose and take care of such matters.

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This approach seems flawed to me. You are setting yourself up for a scenario where a class may be "partially" disposed without committing to it. If you want an inheriting class to be able to do something between unregistering the events and releasing the resources, raise a Disposing event. –  JDB Nov 13 '12 at 14:42
    
I could not disagree with you more. If a calling object decides to call UnregisterFromExternalEvents(), who says that he is trying to dispose, or partially disposing? That object may have its own reasons for calling the method explicitly, rather than relying on Dispose. And if an inheriting class wants to do override Dispose's behavior, it can do so. No reason to downvote at all! –  Roy Dictus Nov 13 '12 at 14:45
    
This may come down to programming style, but I would not separate the event deregistering from the object disposal unless there was a real and specific need to do so. If an object has different states which change the need for event registration, then you should create function or variables to enable the class to change from state to state. But enabling an outside class to disable part of an object's internal workings seems to be like the opposite of loose coupling. –  JDB Nov 13 '12 at 15:20

Yes, it would be good practice to unregistered all external events, but though not extremely necessary, due to loose coupling nature of events. It removes the event entry point reference of the subscriber object from the event generator and yes will be helpful.

For the part to unsubscribe in the dispose method is also fine. The thumb rule of Dispose method is - "Dispose method should unload resources in a way that if the dispose is called more than once it still works, i.e you should free resource in dispose one and only one time. (which would require checks before disposing resources)"

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Events are not necessarily loosely coupled. Failing to unregister an event can cause a class instance to hang around in memory (though, in theory, the class won't be using up to many resources since you've released them all). See Do event handlers stop garbage collection from occuring? –  JDB Nov 13 '12 at 14:44
    
There is a difference between the meaning of "loose coupling nature of events" and "Events are not necessarily loosely coupled". Former can be said as having weak reference mostly so it doesn't become a huge issue in most of the case if you don't unsubscribe explicitly. In manage world clean up mostly is helping the CLR and GC in their work. –  Jsinh Nov 13 '12 at 14:58
    
An event publisher holds a reference to the subscriber, preventing the subscriber from being garbage collected. Event references are not weak - the GC will count it just as surely as any other reference. Meaning that the subscriber's event handler will continue to be called even after Dispose has been called. –  JDB Nov 13 '12 at 15:26
    
You can remain happy by contradicting your own comment and then editing them. For the answer - "Yes its a good practice to unregister from external events in the Dispose method of an IDiposable class". –  Jsinh Nov 13 '12 at 16:29

Yes, it is an extremely good idea. An event publisher holds a reference to the event subscriber which will prevent the subscriber from being garbage collected. (See Do event handlers stop garbage collection from occuring?)

In addition, if your event handlers use the resources you are releasing, then the event handlers (which will continue to be called by the event publisher) may generate exceptions after the resources have been released.

It is important, therefore, to unregister from any events before releasing your resources, especially if you are making use of async or multiple threads, as it is possible in some scenarios for an event to be raised between releasing a resource and unregistering from that event.

The following code demonstrates this:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace ReleaseEvents
{
    class Program
    {
        public static event EventHandler SomethingHappened;

        static void Main( string[] args )
        {
            using ( var l_dependent = new Dependent() )
            {
                SomethingHappened( null, EventArgs.Empty );
            }

            // Just to prove the point, garbage collection
            // will not clean up the dependent object, even
            // though it has been disposed.
            GC.Collect();

            try
            {
                // This call will cause the disposed object
                // (which is still registered to the event)
                // to throw an exception.
                SomethingHappened( null, EventArgs.Empty );
            }
            catch ( InvalidOperationException e )
            {
                Console.ForegroundColor = ConsoleColor.Red;
                Console.WriteLine( e.ToString() );
            }

            Console.ReadKey( true );
        }
    }

    class Dependent : IDisposable
    {
        private object _resource;

        public Dependent()
        {
            Program.SomethingHappened += Program_SomethingHappened;
            _resource = new object();
        }

        private void Program_SomethingHappened( object sender, EventArgs e )
        {
            if ( _resource == null )
                throw new InvalidOperationException( "Resource cannot be null!" );

            Console.WriteLine( "SomethingHappened processed successfully!" );
        }

        public void Dispose()
        {
            _resource = null;
        }
    }
}

The second time that the SomethingHappened event is raised, the Dependent class will throw an InvalidOperationException. You must unregister the event to prevent this from happening:

    class Dependent : IDisposable
    {
        // ...

        public void Dispose()
        {
            Program.SomethingHappened -= Program_SomethingHappened;

            _resource = null;
        }
    }

I actually ran into this problem when I first tried to implement a MVVM architecture. When I was switching between ViewModels, I was simply releasing what I thought was my only reference (an ActiveViewModel property). I didn't realize that the events my ViewModel was subscribed to was keeping it in memory. As the application ran longer, it became slower and slower. Eventually I realized that the ViewModels I thought I had released were actually continuing to process events (expensively). I had to explicitly release the event handlers to fix this problem.

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"You must unregister the event to prevent this from happening" - it's a valid approach, but not the only one. You could just as easily ignore the event if you're disposed - i.e. if ( _resource == null) return; –  Joe Nov 13 '12 at 17:11
    
@Joe - That's true, but there are other scenarios, such as a shared resource, where the resource is not disposed but processing it is still inappropriate. Unregistering the event is always the best approach. –  JDB Nov 13 '12 at 17:42
    
I agree that unsubscribing is the correct approach in some situations, I only disagree with your saying it is "always" the best approach. A counterexample is an ASP.NET Page or UserControl, which is IDisposable and handles events from other controls - and I've never seen any implementation that unregisters the event handlers when disposing. –  Joe Nov 13 '12 at 18:22
    
@Joe - Ok. I'll back off of "always"... if the event publisher is GC'ed, then the subscriber will be too. But the subscriber cannot be GC'ed until the publisher is, and that can make for some very confusing and difficult to trace memory leaks and exceptions. I would argue that even in an ASP page, it is good practice to unregister from events in the Dispose method or destructor. –  JDB Nov 13 '12 at 20:28
    
@Joe - This article illustrates the point, in ASP.NET no less: blogs.msdn.com/b/tess/archive/2006/01/23/… "The moral of the story here is: be very careful if you are hooking up event handlers to objects that have a longer lifespan than the page." –  JDB Nov 13 '12 at 20:36

Thanks to this question I will write my classes as:

class Foo : IDisposable
{
    public event EventHandler MyEvent;

    /// <summary>
    /// When disposing unsubscibe from all events
    /// </summary>
    public void Dispose()
    {
        if (MyEvent != null)
        {
            foreach (Delegate del in MyEvent.GetInvocationList())
                MyEvent -= (del as EventHandler);
        }

        // do the same for any other events in the class
        //  ....
    }
}
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