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How to convert all numbers in bash/shell?

VAR=00005
VAR=00010
VAR=00601
VAR=00550

on

echo $VAR #5
echo $VAR #10
echo $VAR #601
echo $VAR #550

   *** I'm sorry, correction question ***

Thank you ;)

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1  
What have you tried? –  Roy Dictus Nov 13 '12 at 14:30
    
at all, nothing at all I do not know how to do it :-( –  Charlie Nov 13 '12 at 14:32

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

or like this:

kent$  echo "00005
00010
00601
00550"|awk '$0*=1'
5
10
601
550

for your updated question (with VAR)

first of all, you should have different variable names, not all same as VAR.

see the example below:

kent$  VAR=00601

kent$  VAR=$((VAR+0))

kent$  echo $VAR
601

EDIT

for the comment.(08, 09 didn't work):

08, 09 worked here, might be something with my shell to do. I have zsh. I tested followings under bash, they worked. hope helps:

under zsh:

kent$  v=08

kent$  v=$((v+0))

kent$  echo $v
8

under bash, below worked

kent@7PLaptop:/tmp$ bash -version
GNU bash, version 3.2.48(1)-release (i486-pc-linux-gnu)
Copyright (C) 2007 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
kent@7PLaptop:/tmp$ v=08
kent@7PLaptop:/tmp$ v=$(sed 's/^0*//'<<< $v)
kent@7PLaptop:/tmp$ echo $v
8
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VAR=08 #problem, VAR=09 #problem, result 0 –  Charlie Nov 13 '12 at 15:00
    
@Charlie see the EDIT in answer, hope it helps. –  Kent Nov 13 '12 at 15:18
$> cat text    
00005
00010
00601
00550

$> sed -r 's/0*([0-9]*)/\1/' text    
5
10
601
550

Using printf:

$> while read n; do printf "%0d\n" $((10#$n)); done < text
5
10
601
550

Note, when a numerical format expects a number, the internal printf-command will use the common Bash arithmetic rules regarding the base. In order to force decimal representation and as a side effect also remove any leading zeros for a Bash variable we should use $((10#$n))

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just curious, where did 8, 385 and 360 come in your printf? Octal ^_^ –  Kent Nov 13 '12 at 14:40
    
I've added explanations to the answer. –  ДМИТРИЙ МАЛИКОВ Nov 13 '12 at 14:51
    
+1 for specifying the base. –  glenn jackman Nov 13 '12 at 16:47

With extglob, you do not need any external process:

shopt -s extglob                       # Enable extended globbing
for i in 00005 00010 00601 00550; do
    echo ${i##+(0)}
done
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this also avoids octal interpretation by treating the number as merely a string –  glenn jackman Nov 13 '12 at 16:46

You can use printf to add or remove leading zeros:

$ printf "%05d\n" 5    
00005

$ printf "%d\n" 00005
5

$ printf "%010d\n" 00005
0000000005
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to: ДМИТРИЙ МАЛИКОВ

printf "%d\n" 0000
printf "%d\n" 0001
printf "%d\n" 0002
printf "%d\n" 0003
printf "%d\n" 0007
printf "%d\n" 0008
printf "%d\n" 0009
printf "%d\n" 0010
printf "%d\n" 0011
printf "%d\n" 0012

result

0
1
2
3
7
0 line 8: printf: 0008: invalid octal number
0 line 9: printf: 0009: invalid octal number
8 !error - correctly 10
9 !error - correctly 11
10 !error - correctly 12
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Answer is updated –  ДМИТРИЙ МАЛИКОВ Nov 13 '12 at 15:07
    
n=0015; n=$((10#$n)); printf "%d\n" $n15 –  ДМИТРИЙ МАЛИКОВ Nov 13 '12 at 15:20

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