Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
import org.junit.Test;
import edu.umd.cs.findbugs.annotations.DefaultAnnotation;
import edu.umd.cs.findbugs.annotations.NonNull;

@DefaultAnnotation(NonNull.class)
public class FooTest {
    private Foo foo;

    @Before
    public void setUp() throws ParseException {
        foo = ...;
    }

    @Test
    public void testScenario1() {
        foo.getId();
        ...
    }
}

This causes findbugs to fail with:

NP: Nonnull field foo is not initialized 
by new FooTest( (NP_NONNULL_FIELD_NOT_INITIALIZED_IN_CONSTRUCTOR)

Why is that? Does FindBugs not see that this is a junit test? (and therefore setUp() is called before executing each test)

One workaround is to add this class annotation:

@SuppressWarnings(
  value="NP_NONNULL_FIELD_NOT_INITIALIZED_IN_CONSTRUCTOR", 
  justification="it is initialized in setUp()")

but that's not very nice. any better idea?

share|improve this question
1  
I'll comment because I'm not sure if I'm right: What if setUp() throws a ParseException? Does JUnit know it can't be in or before this line: foo = ...; ? So foo could be null. –  jlordo Nov 13 '12 at 14:37
1  
Also, it is a public method in a public class. Why should findbugs assume that junit is the only one ever calling it, even if it were aware of junit's execution pattern? –  arne.b Nov 13 '12 at 14:39
    
I'm not overly familiar with FindBug configuration, but I suspect you can disable that check for all classes matching a pattern (e.g. *Test.java, or whatever). –  Duncan Nov 13 '12 at 15:18
    
arne.b, in my opinion, FindBugs should assume the junit is the only one ever calling it; and if that is not the case (of someone else is calling it), then it should mark that as error/warning (because it is a junit test). what do you think? –  David Portabella Nov 13 '12 at 15:39

3 Answers 3

Why is that? Does FindBugs not see that this is a junit test? (and therefore setUp() is called before executing each test)

Basically, yes. It is pretty obvious that FindBugs doesn't have special knowledge of JUnit test cases and how they work. (I'm a little surprised that you are even running FindBugs over your unit tests ...)

One workaround is to add this class annotation ... Any better idea?

It is simpler to explicitly initialize the field to null. That will should satisfy FindBugs.


Yes, I hesitated to add NonNull annotations in the tests; but the tests themselves can contain bugs, so why not? Why not running FindBugs over the unit tests?

Because of problems like this!

Unit tests are qualitatively different to ordinary code. For instance, if the foo field was accidentally left null, then the worst that can happen is that the unit test will crash, you will spot the bug and fix it. It is not going to directly break production code, and will only have any impact at all if you are in the habit of ignoring failed unit tests.

I cannot initialize foo to null, since it is defined as NonNull (by the DefaultAnnotation)

Well according to TimK's answer, that means that foo MUST be non-null after the constructor has finished executing. Given that you have specified that invariant for your entire codebase (including the testcases) you must either stick to it, or add an exception.

One kludge might be to create a dummy Foo instance, and use that to initialize foo. But it is more straightforward to just to add the SuppressWarnings ...


Frankly, you need to think a bit more deeply about what you are trying to achieve with FindBugs. Running it on your unit tests seems to be creating more problems than it solves.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I hesitated to add NonNull annotations in the tests; but the tests themselves can contain bugs, so why not? Why not running FindBugs over the unit tests? –  David Portabella Nov 13 '12 at 15:33
1  
I cannot initialize foo to null, since it is defined as NonNull (by the DefaultAnnotation). –  David Portabella Nov 13 '12 at 15:34
    
This answer covers the reasons not to run FB on unit tests. You can have it ignore them by setting the path that contains source code if you split them out. Otherwise you must give a naming pattern. –  David Harkness Nov 15 '12 at 0:49
    
It is reasonable to run FindBugs on unit tests -- they can have bugs too. But you have to expect to use a different set of rules for test code, just as you probably use a different set of compilation warnings. (For example, I disable warnings for non-externalized strings and calling deprecated API in test code.) In this case the problem is "@DefaultAnnotation(NonNull.class)", which just doesn't apply to most fields in unit tests. –  TimK Nov 15 '12 at 17:52

The annotation "@DefaultAnnotation(NonNull.class)" means that foo is treated like it is annotated with @NonNull. That means foo is not allowed to be null during its lifetime. In your test it is null between the time the class is instantiated and the time setUp is called. So FindBugs is correctly reporting the problem.

share|improve this answer

Could you possibly paste a real snippet that gives you the same warning and not the sample you gave?

The reason being is that I ran into this exact findbugs situation yesterday, but it was because of a typo:

public class FooTest {
  private Foo foo;

  @Before
  public void setUp() throws ParseException {
    Foo foo = ...;
  }

You will notice I have Foo foo. This defined a local method instance of foo and initializes it instead of initializing the private class attribute.

I know you are not doing that in your code snippet above but I am wondering if your real code in your project is making this mistake. Its a simple typo to check for.

share|improve this answer
    
your test works (after correcting that mistake), because Foo is not defined as NonNull (which is my case). I could define it as Nullable (or remove the DefaultAnnotation), but it would be best if FindBugs realize that this is a unit test, and setUp() is called before executing the tests. –  David Portabella Nov 13 '12 at 15:37

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.