Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to figure out how to structure my Express code, and am confused about how to handle parameters. For sake of example let's imagine that I've written some middleware that loads something from the database:

var loadMW = function (request, response, next) {
    var thingID = request.params.id;
    // load thing from db and put in locals
    response.locals.thing = loadThing(id); //sync for simplicity
    next();
}

This is all good when used in a route like:

app.get('/getThing/:id', loadMW, ...)

Let's imagine, though, that I'd also like to have routes which accept the thing's ID in the request body (I know in this case this appears contrived, but it does come up for real).

app.post('/getThing', loadMW, ...)

That's not going to work, because loadMW expect to look in the request.params. What is the best way to structure the code in this case? I can think of a few alternatives. First would be to define a new middleware:

var loadMWBody = function (request, response, next) {
     var id = request.body.id;
     ...
}

This seems needlessly verbose and a bit ugly.

Another would be to modify the loadMW to always look to the locals for the ID, and then explicitly move the parameters in the routes.

var loadMW = function (request, response, next) {
    var thingID = response.locals.id;
    // load thing from db and put in locals
    response.locals.thing = loadThing(id); //sync for simplicity
    next();
}

app.get('/getThing/:id', function (request, response, next) {
           response.locals.id = request.params.id;
           next();
         },
   loadMW,
   ...)

app.post('/getThing', function (request, response, next) {
           response.locals.id = request.body.id;
           next();
         },
   loadMW,
   ...)

This seems ok, although again is a little bit verbose, and seems a bit mechanical.

I feel like I might be missing something, and that there's a more elegant way to do this. I thought about parameterising the middleware with some sort of function that indicates how to get the parameter, but this isn't really straightforward (as the request isn't in scope at the point of definition).

Anybody got a nice solution to this problem?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There's another way of handling this.

var loadMW = function (request, response, next) {
    var thingID = request.param('id');

    // load thing from db and put in locals
    response.locals.thing = loadThing(id); //sync for simplicity
    next();
}

The documentation for request.param() says that it looks for parameters in order of:

  1. req.paramsexpress.bodyParse()
  2. req.body
  3. req.query

I believe that the req.body section depends on having express.bodyParser() used at some point.

share|improve this answer
    
Ahh, that's very handy to know! Thanks. –  JonyEpsilon Dec 21 '13 at 11:09

Something like the followig is won't do the trick?

var loadMW = function (request, response, next) {
    var thingID;
    if(request.param.id) {
        thingID = request.param.id;
    }
    else {
        thingID = request.body.id;
    }
    // load thing from db and put in locals
    response.locals.thing = loadThing(thingID); //sync for simplicity
    next();
}

You can also have a look to the optional params in express, for less verbosity, given the following route '/user/:id?' the id param is optional.

And have a look to http://expressjs.com/api.html#app.use for middlewares.

share|improve this answer
    
I agree this will work, but if anything I'd say it's less elegant than the original. I'm wondering whether there's some abstraction I'm missing to allow us to do it in a clear and concise way. –  JonyEpsilon Nov 13 '12 at 19:09

If it were my project, this is probs how I'd go about it:

The route handlers encapsulate the knowledge of how the params come from the client, and loadMW just knows how to get it (and serve it – in this example).

app.get('/getThing/:id', function(req, res) { loadMW(req.params, res); });
app.post('/getThing', function(req, res) { loadMW(req.body, res); });

function loadMW(opts, response) {
  var thingId = opts.id;
  ...
}

As the project grows, it may make sense to further abstract loadMW by passing in a callback function as the 2nd param – rather than response.

share|improve this answer
    
So, I wondered about doing it that way. What puts me off a bit is that it's heading towards reimplementing Express' middleware. What I mean is: as you say, loadMW will want to take a callback, as in a real app there'll be more things to do before finishing the response. So, we'll have to come up with a way to pass data on to the callback. And then a way to pass data from that callback on to the next. And in the end, we've just re-invented Express' response.locals and next()! Maybe I'm overthinking this, but it still doesn't seem quite right. –  JonyEpsilon Nov 13 '12 at 19:06
    
Not sayin' I have all the answers; that's why your question is an interesting one. But, as I see it, the routing (i.e. url and param parsing, REST verbs handling, etc) is the main Express feature at work here, and you wouldn't be reinventing any of that. IMO there's nothing wrong with being inventive with how to respond to different routes. What if loadMW() also had to support access via REPL (i.e. no Express involved at all)? Then it wouldn't feel odd to take the "callback approach" with it. –  meetamit Nov 13 '12 at 20:12
    
Hope my comment didn't sound like I was knocking your answer - not what I intended. It is interesting. Using the callback approach, imagine we have a few callbacks, and we want to be able to flexibly use them i.e. use them in different orders/combinations. We'd have to come up with a common signature so that the callbacks could be composed at will. Which basically takes us back to Express locals. But there's something unsavoury about that because it's only one step away from stuffing everything in globals. It feels like there's an abstraction missing, but I really don't see what it is yet! –  JonyEpsilon Nov 13 '12 at 21:14
    
Nah, no offense taken. I understand the issues. –  meetamit Nov 13 '12 at 21:25

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.