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I know that there's quite a few subjects similar to this one, but none of them provided the correct answer I am looking for.

I am struggling to gather all the instances of SQL-Server on our network. It should be able to detect what version of SQl-Server is running. The different versions we have running vary between 'SQL Server 2000' and 'SQL Server 2008 R2'

To give you a little background information, currently I am developing on our local network, but later on it will be run on our servers to gather information.

Some of the information gathered is:

  • application pools
  • iis installations
  • all databases on a server
  • and some more stuff like this

This all above is working without a problem through WMI queries. But I can not get the correct instances of SQl-Server by WMI or namespaces within Visual Studio 2010.

Some of the things I've tried according to other solutions found around stackoverflow and other sites:

  1. WMI, using varying namespaces such as root\\Microsoft\\SqlServer\\ComputerManagement10 with the ServerSettings class. But this only gives SQLSERVER and SQLEXPRESS without a version number. Making it kind of useless.
  2. I also tried root\\CIMV2 Win32_Product including a where like sql clause. But this returns much more data than just what I am looking for. In addition the query itself is very slow.
  3. Later on I found some Classes within Visual Studio such as SqlDataSourceEnumerator for example. Though this only works if a certain service is running and some ports are open. Which we preferably not do due to possible security issues and possible incorrect data
  4. I also saw some people referring to some other namespaces (will write them here once I find them again), but msdn stated that these namespaces we're going to be removed in the near future.

To summarize: I need to retrieve all installed instances of SQL-Server on a domain with versions varying between 2000 and 2008 R2.

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Are you tried the NetServerEnum function? –  RRUZ Nov 13 '12 at 15:42
    
Not yet, that's a new one for me. I'll take a look into it and report my findings later. –  FlorisPrijt Nov 13 '12 at 15:52
    
ok so I played around a bit with the NetServerEnum function. It does return some of the data required, but it looks like as if it still depends around the same things as the SqlDataSourceEnumerator. Just ran it on the local network, and doesn't provide all the sql-server instances on the network. Exactly the same result as with the NetServerEnum. –  FlorisPrijt Nov 13 '12 at 16:20
    
As you said, many people have asked this question before and it isn't really clear why your question is different. What precise information do you need that you cannot find using the methods you've described? And if option 2 returns "more data" than you need, why not just filter or parse it to give only the information you do need? –  Pondlife Nov 13 '12 at 17:05
    
Hey Pondlife, thanks for the reply. The problem is with option 2 that the query is very very slow. It takes about 3-4 minutes to complete. Not very usefull if you need to query that to around 80 machines. The fact about returning more data is that it returns everything in the installed product list with 'sql' inside it. And I am uncertain if I could make the wmi query for that more specific while still let it get all the instances. The reason as to why the other topics didn't provide me the right solution was that they we're outdated, unreliable results or just for one or two specific versions –  FlorisPrijt Nov 14 '12 at 8:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Ok so I resolved the issue. What I have done is a few things:

  • First I scan the domain for machines.
  • Check if the SQLBrowser service is running, if not, start it! which is done by the ServiceController class located in system.ServiceProcess
  • After all the SQLBrowser have been started I use the SqlDataSourceEnumerator to enumerate through all the instances.

For those interested in the code:
Note: you need network admin rights to start it on the remote machines.

public void StartSqlBrowserService(List<String> activeMachines)
{
    ServiceController myService = new ServiceController();
    myService.ServiceName = "SQLBrowser";

    foreach (var machine in activeMachines)
    {
        try
        {
            myService.MachineName = machine;
            string svcStatus = myService.Status.ToString();
            switch (svcStatus)
            {
                case "ContinuePending":
                    Console.WriteLine("Service is attempting to continue.");
                    break;

                case "Paused":
                    Console.WriteLine("Service is paused.");
                    Console.WriteLine("Attempting to continue the service.");
                    myService.Continue();
                    break;

                case "PausePending":
                    Console.WriteLine("Service is pausing.");
                    Thread.Sleep(5000);
                    try
                    {
                        Console.WriteLine("Attempting to continue the service.");
                        myService.Start();
                    }
                    catch (Exception e)
                    {
                        Console.WriteLine(e.Message);
                    }
                    break;

                case "Running":
                    Console.WriteLine("Service is already running.");
                    break;

                case "StartPending":
                    Console.WriteLine("Service is starting.");
                    break;

                case "Stopped":
                    Console.WriteLine("Service is stopped.");
                    Console.WriteLine("Attempting to start service.");
                    myService.Start();
                    break;

                case "StopPending":
                    Console.WriteLine("Service is stopping.");
                    Thread.Sleep(5000);
                    try
                    {
                        Console.WriteLine("Attempting to restart service.");
                        myService.Start();
                    }
                    catch (Exception e)
                    {
                        Console.WriteLine(e.Message);
                    }
                    break;
            }
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(e.Message);
        }
    }
}

And then this is what I use to retrieve the instances.

public static void SqlTestInfo()
{
    SqlDataSourceEnumerator instance = SqlDataSourceEnumerator.Instance;
    DataTable table = instance.GetDataSources();
    DisplayData(table);
}

private static void DisplayData(DataTable table)
{
    foreach (DataRow row in table.Rows)
    {
        foreach (DataColumn dataColumn in table.Columns)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("{0} = {1}", dataColumn.ColumnName, row[dataColumn]);
        }
        Console.WriteLine();
    }
}

It may not be the best solution, some may find it somewhat dirty. But for now it's the best workaround I could get.
Hope this helps any people in the future having the same problem.

share|improve this answer

I used the code from here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd981032.aspx

Works great. Only thing to mention is this is for SQL 2005 - SQL 2008. You'll have to check for ComputerManagement11 for SQL 2012.

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