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I am building an email and I need an image ( a call to action button) to be on the top of another, with he following code it's only working in few clients:

<tr>
    <td align="center" width="660" height="457" valign="top"><img width="660" height="457" style="display:block; vertical-align:top; margin:0; padding:0; outline:none; border:none;" src="image_1.jpg" />
    <a href="http://www.facebook.com/LurpakButter/app_299490026832067"><img width="341" height="56" style="display:block; vertical-align:top; margin-top:-300px; padding:0; outline:none; border:none;" src="cta.png" /></a></td>
</tr>

Is there a better way of doing this?

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Why do you need it to be on top of another image? –  Shmiddty Nov 13 '12 at 15:50
    
Without a visual it is hard to say. Likely you simply need to cut your images differently. –  Jrod Nov 13 '12 at 15:50
    
What do you mean by "clients"? Some email clients might only support html 3.2... in other words, support for CSS in some email clients is limited to non-existent. –  seth flowers Nov 13 '12 at 15:50
1  
"With no support for margin..." email-standards.org/clients/gmail/#margin –  Scott Brown Nov 13 '12 at 15:54

3 Answers 3

Positioning and many other CSS features that may cause content to jump or leak-out of the client area on many mail clients is restricted. Therefore, positioning elements on top of each other is impossible on many mail clients.

For web-based clients, most of this is deliberate to prevent emails from spoofing client features. For MS-Outlook it's a matter of it using the ever so crappy MS-WORD rendering engine.

Here's a good guide to what you can use.

http://www.campaignmonitor.com/css/

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Looks like you are trying to work around the fact that email doesn't support background images in tables (consistently across clients anyway). Clever idea with the margin-top:-300;, but it seems like it isn't working as hoped. (css margin isn't supported across the board).

The only way I know of to get the desired layout is to cut the background image up into smaller blocks:

<table width="660" border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0">
  <tr>    
    <td width="660" colspan="3">
      <img width="660" height="100" style="margin: 0; border: 0; padding: 0; display: block;" src="image_1.jpg" />
    </td>
  </tr>
  <tr>    
    <td width="60">
      <img width="60" height="50" style="margin: 0; border: 0; padding: 0; display: block;" src="image_1.jpg" />
    </td>
    <td width="300">        
      <a href="http://www.facebook.com/LurpakButter/app_299490026832067"><img width="300" height="50" style="margin: 0; border: 0; padding: 0; display: block;" src="cta.png" /></a>
    </td>
    <td width="300">
      <img width="300" height="50" style="margin: 0; border: 0; padding: 0; display: block;" src="image_1.jpg" />
    </td>
  </tr>
  <tr>    
    <td align="center" width="660" colspan="3">
      <img width="660" height="100" style="margin: 0; border: 0; padding: 0; display: block;" src="image_1.jpg" />
    </td>
  </tr>
</table>

Alternatively you could just make one big image and do image mapping, but that probably isn't the best practice for a call to action.

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This is by far the most consistent way that I've found. With email clients having such a wide range of support for html and css, using minimal to no css and building the html with tables gives me peace of mind knowing that most of the recipients of the email are going to view it as intended. It definitely feels like you're working on a website in 1997, but it's worth it. –  Jason Nov 13 '12 at 18:17

In Gmail, use padding instead of margin for spacings, and like Diodeus mentioned campaignmonitor is a good resource

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