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I'm getting data in json format from different sources and I'm trying to map them to objects implementing the same interface.

The json variable looks something like this from feed 1:

{"identifier": 232, "type": "Feed1"}

And I'm serializing it using this object:

   [DataContract]
    public class Class A : InterfaceA
    {

        [DataMember(Name = "identifier")]
        public int Id{ get; set; }

        [DataMember(Name = "type")]
        public FeedType Type { get; set; }
    }

    [DataContract]
    public enum FeedType
    {
        [EnumMember(Value = "Feed1")]
        FeedA,
        [EnumMember(Value = "Feed2")]
        FeedB,
        [EnumMember(Value = "Feed3")]
        FeedC
    }

The interface looks like this:

public interface InterfaceA
{
   int Id {get;set;}
   FeedType Type{get;set;}
}

In feed 2, the object looks like this:

{"identifier": 232, "feedType": "A"}

How can I create another object that implements the same interface and will return the same enum? How do I set up the DataContract?

EDIT:

I serialize it like this

            var serializer = new DataContractJsonSerializer(ClassA);

            var ms = new MemoryStream(Encoding.Unicode.GetBytes(json));
            var serializedObject = serializer.ReadObject(ms);
share|improve this question
    
first things first, you cannot create an instance of an interface so you will need to create an instance of an actual class, have you thought about using a generic method? –  Liam Nov 13 '12 at 16:19
    
Can you include the code where you actually seralize the Json too? –  Liam Nov 13 '12 at 16:23
    
@Liam I did think about generic types. But I would like it to be the same type of enum. –  johan Nov 13 '12 at 16:26

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'll give an answer using Json.Net (of course if you are open to use a different serializer)

string json = @"{""identifier"": 232, ""type"": ""Feed2""}";
var classa = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<ClassA>(json);

.

public interface InterfaceA
{
    int Id { get; set; }
    FeedType Type { get; set; }
}

public class ClassA : InterfaceA
{
    [JsonProperty("identifier")]
    public int Id{ get; set; }

    [JsonConverter(typeof(MyConverter))] //<--- !!!
    [JsonProperty("type")]
    public FeedType Type { get; set; }
}

[DataContract]
public enum FeedType
{
    [EnumMember(Value = "Feed1")]
    FeedA,
    [EnumMember(Value = "Feed2")]
    FeedB,
    [EnumMember(Value = "Feed3")]
    FeedC
}

And this is the type converter class

public class MyConverter : Newtonsoft.Json.Converters.StringEnumConverter
{
    public override bool CanConvert(Type objectType)
    {
        return objectType == typeof(FeedType);
    }


    public override object ReadJson(JsonReader reader, Type objectType, object existingValue, JsonSerializer serializer)
    {
        var field = objectType.GetFields()
            .First(f => f.GetCustomAttributes(false)
                         .Any(a=>a.GetType()==typeof(EnumMemberAttribute) &&
                                 ((EnumMemberAttribute)a).Value.Equals(reader.Value))); 



        return field.GetValue(null);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Exactly like that, but I would prefer not having to swith serializer –  johan Nov 13 '12 at 17:17
    
@johan As you can see it gives much more control over serialization/deserialization process than other serializers. (BTW MVC4 also uses it). –  L.B Nov 13 '12 at 17:22
1  
Well, since I'm not getting any other answer I guess is the best solution. Thanks –  johan Nov 14 '12 at 15:45

so if you want a class B

[DataContract]
    public class ClassB : InterfaceA
    {

        [DataMember(Name = "identifier")]
        public int Id{ get; set; }

        [DataMember(Name = "type")]
        public FeedType Type { get; set; }
    }

var serializer = new DataContractJsonSerializer(ClassB);

            var ms = new MemoryStream(Encoding.Unicode.GetBytes(json));
            var serializedObject = serializer.ReadObject(ms);

Thats it?! you could use a generic if you wanted to reuse the code:

public T SerialiseObject<T>(string json) where T : InterfaceA
{
var serializer = new DataContractJsonSerializer(T);

var ms = new MemoryStream(Encoding.Unicode.GetBytes(json));
 return (T)serializer.ReadObject(ms);
}

then call it:

SerialiseObject<ClassA>(json);
SerialiseObject<ClassB>(json);

to explain more fully you could not have

public class ClassA : InterfaceA
{
 public ns1.FeedType Type{get; set;}
}

and

public class ClassB : InterfaceA
{
  public ns2.FeedType Type{get; set;}
}

this would not compile as InterfaceA would expect either ns1.FeedType or ns2.FeedType

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but I don't think that answers my question. How would that serialize "feedType" in the second json response correctly to the enum? –  johan Nov 13 '12 at 16:38
    
FeedType would be the same type in both? It'd need to be or else it would break the interface declaration? –  Liam Nov 13 '12 at 17:04
    
I understand that fully. But you solution wouldn't work as the json looks different. What you explain as not a funtional solution would work if the interface uses generic types. –  johan Nov 13 '12 at 17:11

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