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I saw in many source codes:

var me = this;

specially in Ext-JS 4 (JS framework). Why doing such thing? Is there any other reason or you just want for a variable to be called like "me" instead of "this"?

Thank you.

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6  
That is used in closures or callbacks, when the context of this changes inside the anonymous function. More often, you will see var that = this –  Michael Berkowski Nov 13 '12 at 16:23
    
Oh, I understand. It could be changed inside function... Well thank you. :) –  user1509885 Nov 13 '12 at 16:24
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4 Answers 4

up vote 31 down vote accepted

Usually so you can keep a reference to this inside a scope in which this refers to something else (like a callback function, for example).

Consider this example, in which the click event handler function has a different context to what you may expect (this doesn't refer to an instance of MyClass):

var MyClass = function (elem) {
    this.elem = elem;
    this.name = "James";
    elem.addEventListener("click", function () {
        alert(this.name); //oops
    }, false);
};

Now consider this example, in which we store a reference to the value of this inside the constructor function, and use that inside the callback function:

var MyClass = function (elem) {
    var me = this;
    this.elem = elem;
    this.name = "James";
    elem.addEventListener("click", function () {
        alert(me.name); //works!
    }, false);
};

The callback function can refer to a variable that was declared in the outer function, even after that function has returned (the MyClass constructor returns as soon as it's executed the addEventListener). This is a demonstration of a closure.

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I understand and thank you. :) –  user1509885 Nov 13 '12 at 16:25
    
@user1509885 - You're welcome, glad I could help :) –  James Allardice Nov 13 '12 at 16:31
    
You gave much more info in your answer than others so this answer will be marked as accepted. Just 4 more minutes... Daaah... –  user1509885 Nov 13 '12 at 16:33
2  
nice, short and to the point. +1 –  dbrin Nov 13 '12 at 17:47
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Basically this utilizes closure in javascript. Read this about closure.

It is used to carry the particular instance of this to function calls where this has a different meaning.

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Understand. Thank you. :) –  user1509885 Nov 13 '12 at 16:27
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when using an objects method inside of a callback function this will refer to the function you are in so me is used to reference another object

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Understand. Thank you. :) –  user1509885 Nov 13 '12 at 16:27
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Though of course closures are the more obvious reason for doing this, I just wanted to add that another reason can be to reduce the size of the minified version of a javascript file.

this as a keyword cannot be renamed in the process of minifying the file, while a local variable can. In other words, whenever you would use this (4 characters), instead a 1 character local variable can be used.

Consider the following example function of ExtJS's Ext.data.Store:

filterBy: function(fn, scope) {
    var me = this;

    me.snapshot = me.snapshot || me.data.clone();
    me.data = me.queryBy(fn, scope || me);
    me.fireEvent('datachanged', me);
    me.fireEvent('refresh', me);
}

(note there's no closure involved here)

and its minified version:

filterBy:function(b,a){var c=this;c.snapshot=c.snapshot||c.data.clone();c.data=c.queryBy(b,a||c);c.fireEvent("datachanged",c);c.fireEvent("refresh",c)}

(151 characters/bytes)

Now, let's compare it to the minified version if we did not assign this to a local variable:

filterBy:function(b,a){this.snapshot=this.snapshot||this.data.clone();this.data=this.queryBy(b,a||this);this.fireEvent("datachanged",this);this.fireEvent("refresh",this)}

(170 characters/bytes)

As you can see the version with a local variable only takes 88% of the size of the function which uses this each time instead.

Especially in big libraries this can reduce the file size quite a bit.

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