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This works (It prints some text to the screen):

$(document).ready(function() {

var uspTot = 1
var keyTot = 5

    $('.field .button').click(function(){
    var theSibling = $(this).siblings('div').attr('id');
    if (theSibling == 'usp'){
       $(this).before('the string is usp')
       uspTot++ 
    } else if (theSibling == 'keywords')(
       $(this).before('the string is keywords') 
    )
});

However this doesn't do anything:

$(document).ready(function() {

var uspTot = 1
var keyTot = 5

    $('.field .button').click(function(){
    var theSibling = $(this).siblings('div').attr('id');
    if (theSibling == 'usp'){
       $(this).before('the string is usp')
       uspTot++ 
    } else if (theSibling == 'keywords')(
       $(this).before('the string is keywords')
       keyTot++
    )
});

The only difference between the two is this bit of code:

keyTot++

I can't understand why this is completely breaking my basic script so I'm hoping someone here can point and say "Oh that's because you've forgotten to XXXX, you daft thing" - Or words to that effect.

share|improve this question
1  
What if you use semicolons (as IMO you should generally do in JS)? –  Dave Newton Nov 13 '12 at 16:32
1  
@JamesMcLaughlin I strongly disagree with semicolons being "completely stylistic" –  Adrian Carneiro Nov 13 '12 at 16:34
1  
@Adrian, while you may disagree, this is absolutely no NEED to use semicolons in javascript. (I do use them by the way, maybe because my primary language is C#?) –  gdoron Nov 13 '12 at 16:37
1  
@gdoron Even more fun than that: jsfiddle.net/28yX3 –  James McLaughlin Nov 13 '12 at 16:44
1  
@gdoron Since you use them, you won't have been bitten by not using them. Relying on getting the ambiguous cases right is rarely the right answer, and leads to inconsistent coding style. While it wasn't the issue in this case, why risk it being the issue? –  Dave Newton Nov 13 '12 at 16:45

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You got typo with the braces:

} else if (theSibling == 'keywords')(
       $(this).before('the string is keywords')
       keyTot++
    )

Should be:

} else if (theSibling == 'keywords'){
       $(this).before('the string is keywords')
       keyTot++
    }

The curly braces are mandatory for more than one command, this is why you're not getting the error.

When you used regular braces the code was treated as:

} else if (theSibling == 'keywords')
    ($(this).before('the string is keywords'))

Which is valid, but useless...

share|improve this answer
    
Oh my gosh - That's it! I can't believe I missed that. Thank you so much :) –  Andrew Nov 13 '12 at 16:39
else if (theSibling == 'keywords')(
        $(this).before('the string is keywords')
        keyTot++
)

You wanted curly braces:

else if (theSibling == 'keywords'){
        $(this).before('the string is keywords')
        keyTot++
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks, I feel a bit of a numpty now :) –  Andrew Nov 13 '12 at 16:39

You are using regular brace where you should be using curly braces. Proper sintax for if and else is if(){} else if () {} So your both blocks are wrong.

share|improve this answer

You are missing semicolons after the $this.before(); statements.

share|improve this answer
    
Semicolons are not mandatory in JavaScript. –  James McLaughlin Nov 13 '12 at 16:37
    
@JamesMcLaughlin. For some reason lots of people think so. :( –  gdoron Nov 13 '12 at 16:44

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