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I have the following code:

public class ThreadTest implements Runnable {
    public int ThrCount    = 0;

    public void ThrCountIncr() {
        while (true) {
            ThrCount++;
            System.out.println(ThrCount);
            try {
                Thread.currentThread().sleep(500);
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    }

    public void run() {
        while (true) {
            if (ThrCount > 10) {
                System.out.println(ThrCount + "\n Thread finished");
                System.exit(1);
            }
            try {
                Thread.currentThread().sleep(100);
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    }
}

But when I remove this line from run, it stops working:

Thread.currentThread().sleep(100);

First, I start the thread, then I use ThrCountIncr.

ThreadTest Thrtest = new ThreadTest();
Thread thr = new Thread(Thrtest);
thr.start();
Thrtest.ThrCountIncr();

The thread checks the ThrCount variable value, and if it is greater than 10, it stops the program. Without sleep(100), the thread doesn't stop the program, and I think it doesn't check the variable value. Why does the call to sleep make this code work?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Even with the Thread.sleep() it might not work. This is because you don't properly synchronize accesses to the shared ThrCount variable.

If you make that variable volatile, you should not see any issues any longer. However it might not loop exactly 10 times as the ++ operation is not atomic.

Ideally, you should use an AtomicInteger and use its incrementAndGet() method.

Also note:

  • Java naming conventions: variables and method names should start in lower case (thrCount, thrCountIncr()
  • sleep is a static method so you can simply call Thread.sleep(...); and it will sleep in the current thread.
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I understand. It's only for my experiments. Thank you. –  kden Nov 13 '12 at 16:54

If your thread doesn't sleep, other threads may not be able to work, so the the loop inside ThrCountIncr may get stuck at any time (probably at its first sleep or at the println).

Never have a thread looping without any kind of sleep or wait.

Note also that ThrCount++; may fail if you don't protect it using a synchronization, as it's not an atomic operation.

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1  
thr.start() runs in a different thread and returns immediately... I don't think what you describe can happen. –  assylias Nov 13 '12 at 16:46
    
I agree with assylias comment. This is not correct. –  Nambari Nov 13 '12 at 16:49
2  
thanks for answer, so second thread eat all processor time fo this process. –  kden Nov 13 '12 at 16:53

When a loop has iterated more than 10,000 times it can be optimised by the JIT. In the case of the second thread, the code for the thread doesn't modify the field so the JIT can either optimise away the if condition or determine it is always run.

If you make the field volatile this prevents the JIT making such optimisations.

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10.000 times? Really? Do you have a source? I wonder why it´s not 5.000, or 100.000. –  TheBlastOne Nov 13 '12 at 17:10
2  
-XX:CompileThreshold=10000 from oracle.com/technetwork/java/javase/tech/… –  Peter Lawrey Nov 13 '12 at 17:13

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