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I have classes A and B with both having their header files with include guards. One reads:

#ifndef A_H
#define A_H

#include "B.h"

class A
{
B b;
};

#endif

And the other one:

#ifndef B_H
#define B_H

#include "A.h"

class B
{
A a;
};

#endif

Now I test it with the following main.cpp:

#include "A.h"

int main()
{
        A a;
}

The compiling error is as follows:

# make main
g++     main.cpp   -o main
B.h:8: error: ‘A’ does not name a type

Is there any solution to this situation, other than using a pointer/reference and a forward declaration?

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1  
If you think about it for a second, the answer is clearly "no this doesn't work." You would create a loop, where a B contains an A which contains a B, etc. –  Xymostech Nov 13 '12 at 17:38
    
Could you describe what you are trying to achieve with this data model? Perhaps we can suggest more appropriate solution. –  Robᵩ Nov 13 '12 at 17:41

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

No, it's not possible: one of them needs to be a pointer or a reference: because if A contains B, which contains A, which contains B, then you have infinite recursion and are trying to specify infinite sized object.

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Well, not directly, that's correct, but the pImpl-idiom is an easy way aroung this (see below). –  Johannes S. Nov 13 '12 at 17:57

No there is no other option than to use pointer/reference and forward declaration, unfortunately.

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You can't do that, you would cause an infinite recursion (A would include B, B would include, A ...), plus the compiler won't allow it because in one of the class declarations the other class will be incomplete. (Not fully defined)

You can just do this if one of them is a pointer or a reference.

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I suggest to use the pImpl idiom if possible ( Pointer-to-implementation, other names: Opaque pointer, Handle-body idiom, Cheshire Cat... see here for details. )

It basically allows you to "free" your class declaration from implementation details that are usually visible to users of your class (even though they are not usable, assuming private access).

You simply declare your class as follows:

#ifndef A_H
#define A_H

class A{
public:
     //declare public methods -> "interface"
private:
     struct Private;
     Private * mp_d;  //feel free to use smart pointer
};

#endif

The forward declared struct (or class ) is only defined in your source file and contains all implementation details like you data members and functions that are internal to your class.

#include "B.h"
struct A::Private {
      B a;
};


A::A() : mp_d( new Private()) {
} 

A::~A(){
    delete mp_d;   //not required if using smart pointer
}

NB: Now the compiler-generated copy constructor and assignement operators don't work any more (as expected). Make sure to either implement them yourself or simply prevent the compiler from generating them by declaring them private (without implementation). (This is basically C++03 style; I think in C++11 you simply add = deleteafter the declaration to prevent compiler-generation.)

EDIT: added "long" name of pImpl

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