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For example,

Would it be more memory efficient to display these variables like this:

std::cout << "First char is " << char1 << " and second char is " << char2;

rather than this:

std::cout << "First char is " << char1;
std::cout << " and second char is " << char2;

Of course, I'm not literally worried about two lines of code.. But I'm trying to learn to write code more efficiently

Thank you

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7  
If you're printing anything to the console the console will be the bottleneck. –  Mysticial Nov 13 '12 at 17:55
2  
There is no difference what-so-ever. It's all just function calls, and you either pass the argument implicitly (when chaining) or explicitly (when writing a new statement). –  Xeo Nov 13 '12 at 17:55
    
I think the second one is easier to read. That might be more efficient for the people working with the code. –  Bo Persson Nov 13 '12 at 18:35

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Having it be a single statement could theoretically be faster as the compiler can rearrange the order of argument evaluation more freely. However, this is talking about 0.00000000000001% difference and is pointless. Don't care about this - the bottleneck is in the console itself.

Anyway, column alignment is really helpful for readability and so try this:

std::cout <<       "First char is " << char1;
std::cout << " and second char is " << char2;

Or this:

std::cout <<       "First char is " << char1
          << " and second char is " << char2;

(I prefer the first because I find it easier to format in my text editor).

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Oh, argument reordering is indeed a good point. Not that I can see how you'd get a performance boost out of it, but hey. –  Xeo Nov 13 '12 at 18:03

It makes no difference with programs that small. The toss-up comes with readability. Do u want it quick and easy or more readable?

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1  
It doesn't make any difference for large programs either. You can have a single statement with 10000-chained operators or 10000 statements with no chaining, it'll be the same in the end. –  Xeo Nov 13 '12 at 17:59
    
Read next answer :) –  imulsion Nov 13 '12 at 18:04

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