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I'm just playing around with the call_user_func function in PHP and am getting this error when running this simple code:

<?php


class A
{

    public $var;
    private function printHi()
    {

        echo "Hello";   

    }

    public function __construct($string)
    {
        $this->var = $string;   


    }

    public function foo()
    {

        call_user_func($this->var); 

    }

}

$a = new A('printHi');
$a->foo();


?>

I know that if I make a function outside the class called printHi, it works fine, but I'm referring to the class's print hi and not sure why the "this" isn't being registered.

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1  
call_user_func_array(array($this,'printHi'), array($arg1, $arg2)); –  GBD Nov 13 '12 at 18:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

$this->var is evaluating to printHi in your example however when you are calling a method of a class you need to pass the callback as an array where the first element is the object instance and the second element is the function name:

call_user_func(array($this, $this->var));

Here is documentation on valid callbacks: http://www.php.net/manual/en/language.types.callable.php

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1  
add 'because it is a method on $this, not a global function' and I will +1 –  Bob Fincheimer Nov 13 '12 at 18:13
    
@BobFincheimer Done! –  Omar Jackman Nov 13 '12 at 18:16
    
Thanks a lot!! That helped and it works now. –  thed0ctor Nov 13 '12 at 18:44

Alternatively to Omar's answer, you can also make printHi() a class static function, so you then can call it from call_user_func('A::printHi') , like this:

class A
{

    public $var;
    public static function printHi()
    {

        echo "Hello";   

    }

    public function __construct($string)
    {
        $this->var = $string;   


    }

    public function foo()
    {

        call_user_func($this->var); 

    }

}

$a = new A('A::printHi');
$a->foo();

See live example

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thank you for this response! I will keep this in mind –  thed0ctor Nov 14 '12 at 4:40

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