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Today I came across a bit of a dilema. I have created an app that uses GDI+ to draw on a form. The drawing is triggered by a timer every second. The draw method uses a for loop to iterate through a collection of objects and if they are of a certain state, draw them.

I want to draw them using a LinearGradientBrush simply because it looks so much nicer than a simple Brush. Have a look at the following

            //minutes
        foreach (Led l in MinuteGrid.Leds)
        {
            LinearGradientBrush b = new LinearGradientBrush
                (l.LedRectangle, Color.GreenYellow, Color.Green, 110);

            if (l.IsLit)
                g.FillRectangle(b, l.LedRectangle);

            b.Dispose();
        }

I am creating a new LinearGradientBrush for each iteration of the loop (which bothers me), but thats because I have to. I cannot create one outside the loop because its constructor set demands that I set parameters which are only ever known inside the loop.

I find that using the dispose method on the LinearGradientBrush object is not all that reliable. If I run my app and view it in Task manager, its spewing memory. When I then add the b = null line that seems to help hugely as follows

            foreach (Led l in MinuteGrid.Leds)
        {
            LinearGradientBrush b = new LinearGradientBrush
                (l.LedRectangle, Color.GreenYellow, Color.Green, 110);

            if (l.IsLit)
                g.FillRectangle(b, l.LedRectangle);

            if (b != null)
            {
                b.Dispose();
                b = null;
            }
        }

I am just wondering if there is a better way to work with LinearGradientBrushes ? Or is there a better solution to use ?

Many thanks

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4 Answers 4

I would recommend using a "using" statement:

foreach (Led l in MinuteGrid.Leds)
{
     if (l.IsLit)
     {
         using(LinearGradientBrush b = new LinearGradientBrush(l.LedRectangle, Color.GreenYellow, Color.Green, 110))
         {
            g.FillRectangle(b, l.LedRectangle);
         }
     }
}

However, remember, Dispose() does not free (managed) memory. It just releases the unmanaged resources (which is important, and may include unmanaged memory). The memory will not free until the GC runs, which may not happen during your loop.

However, if the memory pressure gets too high, the garbage collector should run within your loop, and you'll see it drop. This is the way .NET is designed - just accept it, and don't worry. The GC will eventually collect this memory, so its not something to worry about.

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bingo... to test your theory, they should call gc.collect at the end of each execution and see if the memory is re-claimed... keyword in this one is "test", don't leave gc.collects in production code. –  Brian Rudolph Aug 26 '09 at 21:04

Add a gradient brush to each Led. If you can't add it to that class, then you could use a Dictionary<Led,GradientBrush> to store the brushes in to gain easy access to them. That way you only need one brush per Led instead of one per loop iteration,

(Also, in your example code, there is no point creating the brush if !l.IsLit)

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slaps head, doh! of course you are so right, im a bit embarrassed by that :) –  Kieran Aug 26 '09 at 19:07

Dispose has nothing to do with freeing managed memory. That is handled entirely by GC, which runs "when needed". However, since the brush most likely holds a handle, you should dispose it. I would recommend that you do that in a using block instead of manually calling Dispose as this will make sure Dispose is called even in the presence of an exception.

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If the number of permutations is limited you might just pre-create all your brushes once:

LinearGradientBrush rectGreenBrush = new LinearGradientBrush(l.LedRect........);
LinearGradientBrush rectRedBrush = new LinearGradientBrush(l.LedRect........);

foreach (Led l in MinuteGrid.Leds)
{
  LinearGradientBrush b = null;
  if (xxx)
    b = rectGreenBrush;
  else if (yyyy)
    b = rectRedBrush;
  else.....


  do painting
}

cleanup brushes

A second option is similar, but to create the brushes as needed;

List<LinearGradientBrush> createdBrushes = new List<LinearGradientBrush>();

foreach (Led l in MinuteGrid.Leds)
{
  LinearGradientBrush b = null;

  b = FindOrCreateBrushBasedOnLed(l, createdBrushes); 
  // if not already created, creates the brush and adds it to the list

  do painting
}

foreach (LinearGradientBrush b in createdBrushes)
{
  cleanup brushes
}

The other answers are correct that .NET may allow managed memory usage to balloon as long as it's not harming anything. But this should help cut out a lot of the creating/deleting if there are many Led objects to loop through.

share|improve this answer
    
Clyde, many thanks but I refer you to mt original post. 1. I canot create the brushes outside the loop because paramaters needed for their creation (led rectangle) are only known inside the loop. 2. What is the "FindOrCreateBrushBasedOnLed" object in your code? where does that come from ? Many thanks –  Kieran Aug 26 '09 at 19:01

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