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I am slightly confused with the keyword abstract here. My compiler is telling me that I am not allowed to have a body for a method that's abstract. However my assignment says:

The abstract method orderDescription() returns a String giving details about a particular order.

abstract String orderDescription()
{
    return null;
}

However my code returns an error, as I mentioned above. So my question is what should I do for this problem?

Up to now I've just removed the keyword abstract and it works fine.

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marked as duplicate by Mad Physicist, Alexandre Santos, Brad Werth, Kevin Panko, Paul Hicks Aug 29 '14 at 5:51

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

6 Answers 6

up vote 20 down vote accepted
abstract String orderDescription()
{
    return null;
}

should be

abstract String orderDescription();

As error says, your abstract method declaration shouldn't contain any body.

Above syntax mandates the implementation (which ever class extends the abstract class and provides implementation) to return a String.

You can't instantiate abstract class, so some class need to extend abstract class and provide implementation for this abstract method.

Example:

class MyabsClass 
{
  abstract String orderDescription();
}

class MyImplementation extends MyabsClass
{
   public String orderDescription()
    {
    return "This is description";
    }
}



 class MyClient
   {
     public static void main(String[] args)
      {
         MyImplementation imple = new MyImplementation();
         imple.orderDescription();
      }
   } 
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I understand that, as abstract methods cannot have bodies to them. But I am supposed to return a String so how would return something if I can't have a body? –  user1327636 Nov 13 '12 at 19:39
    
@user1327636: Updated answer with theory. Shortly will provide an example. –  Nambari Nov 13 '12 at 19:41
    
@user1327636, That responsibility is delegated to the subclass that inherits this abstract method, but the return type constraint is enforced through the language by the parent class. –  mre Nov 13 '12 at 19:41
2  
@Nambari If a class includes abstract methods, then the class itself must be declared abstract. MyabsClass must be defined as abstract. –  VVK Apr 14 '14 at 12:58

Also, adding to Nambari's example, what you can do is

class MyabsClass 
{
  abstract String orderDescription();
}

 class MyClient
   {
     public static void main(String[] args)
      {
         MyabsClass mac = new MyabsClass(){
              public String orderDescription()
              {
                     return "This is description";
              }
         };
         mac.orderDescription();
      }
   }

That is, through anonymous class.

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Abstract method should not have any method body. It allows only method declaration.

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Abstract methods generally shouldn't contain any "real" code, abstract methods are to be overidden by non-abstract classes containing the method.

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When you define an abstract method, you are telling the compiler that any subclasses must provide an implementation (or also declare themselves abstract).

You implement the abstract method in a subclass.

Remember, you cannot create instances of abstract classes themselves. The entire point of an abstract method is to tell the compiler that you want subclasses to provide the functionality.

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This should be the answer. An abstract class can have code, it, however, cannot be instantiated. The abstract class must be subclassed. –  Clocker Aug 30 '13 at 15:47

Essentially, an abstract function shouldn't contain any details, it is a placeholder function for inherited functions. As Nambari stated, you should only include the definition.

This is used for when you want a family of classes to all contain a common function, which you wish each child class to define.

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