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WIth the help of the members of this community, especially by Daniel I can mke the list of pascal triangles number. BUt Whenever i want to display the triangle as a triangle shape it gives error like: parse error on input 'import'. I expct some1 will cme forward to explain me this. the code is below:

    import Text.Printf

    pascal :: [[Integer]]
    pascal = iterate (\prev -> 1 : zipWith (+) prev (tail prev) ++ [1]) [1]

    prettyPascal :: Int -> IO ()
    prettyPascal n = mapM_ (\r -> printf "%*s\n" (div (longest + length r) 2) r) rows
    where rows = map (unwords . map show) $ take (n + 1) pascal
      longest = length $ last rows
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That's strange. You should get a parse error on the line with the where, that must be indented farther than prettyPascal. And that's where I get a parse error. I'm not sure if you do that in your files, or if it's how you format your code here on Stack Overflow, but it is not a good idea to let the top level code start in a column that is not the first (too easy to mess up). Further, you would need a module declaration module Whatever where, without one, module Main (main) where is assumed, and compilation fails if there is no main. –  Daniel Fischer Nov 13 '12 at 20:37
    
where is not indented properly HERE. Will main be like this: main :: IO () main = prettyPascal 10 –  sabu Nov 13 '12 at 20:53
    
Yes, that could be the main. But if you add a module declaration, you can make the other definitions in that module available to other modules, so I'd still recommend doing that. –  Daniel Fischer Nov 13 '12 at 20:56

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Summary answer:

module PrettyPascal where  -- good practice, means you can combine it with other code
import Text.Printf

pascal :: [[Integer]]
pascal = iterate (\prev -> 1 : zipWith (+) prev (tail prev) ++ [1]) [1]

where must be further indented than the line before, and longest must line up with rows:

prettyPascal :: Int -> IO ()
prettyPascal n = mapM_ (\r -> printf "%*s\n" (div (longest + length r) 2) r) rows
 where rows = map (unwords . map show) $ take (n + 1) pascal
       longest = length $ last rows

You could do main = prettyPascal 10, but you might prefer:

main = 
    putStrLn "How many rows of Pascal's triangle would you like to see?"
    >> readLn >>= prettyPascal

(If you're using ghci or Hugs, you don't need a main, you can just type prettyPrint 10 at the prompt.)

Other points from discussion below:

  • Haskell is case sensitive, so it has to be prettyPascal, not PrettyPascal.
  • When you're using a type class (as in your other code), you need Eq a => instead of Eq a ->
  • Use copy-and-paste to avoid typing errors
  • Save your functions in a file called something like PrettyPascal.hs.
  • Then load your functions in ghci by typing :l PrettyPascal.
  • Sometimes if you're not sure whether it's your compiler or your code, copy-and-paste to codepad.org for a second opinion. (You could also download and install the fast Hugs compiler which does Haskell 98 and multiparameter typeclasses, but not lots of ghc extensions.)
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it shows the same error like:parse error on input 'module' –  sabu Nov 14 '12 at 9:01
    
@SaugataBose That's strange. Which editor are you using, on what operating system? What compiler/interpreter are you using? –  AndrewC Nov 14 '12 at 16:13
    
i am using ghci 6.12.3. this is the whole code i m giving the complier to compile: module prettyPascal where import Text.Printf pascal' = iterate (\prev -> 1 : zipWith (+) prev (tail prev) ++ [1]) [1] prettyPascal n = mapM_ (\r -> printf "%*s\n" (div (longest + length r) 2) r) rows where rows = map (unwords . map show) $ take (n + 1) pascal' longest = length $ last rows –  sabu Nov 14 '12 at 20:31
    
@SaugataBose Are you really sure that that's all that's in the file? Which editor are you using, on what operating system? I'd only expect this sort of message if your file doesn't start with the word module. –  AndrewC Nov 14 '12 at 20:41
1  
Excellent. Fantbullous. atlast i got a solutiion and most important is that I learn few technique. thanx a lot. NOw i have to solve the 2nd one: the permutation one which showed same prblm –  sabu Nov 14 '12 at 22:09

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