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I've recently spent a lot of time with javascript and am now coming back to C++. When I'm accessing a class member from a method I feed inclined to prefix it with this->.

class Foo {

  int _bar;

public:  
  /* ... */

  void setBar(int bar) {
    this->_bar = bar;
    // as opposed to
    _bar = bar;
  }
}

On reading, it saves me a brain cycle when trying to figure out where it's coming from.
Are there any reasons I shouldn't do this?

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That extra brain cycle is saved by reading the function name. –  chris Nov 13 '12 at 20:06
11  
Yes -- because to others who are actually accustomed to C++, it will take even more extra brain cycles, trying to figure out whether you think you're writing something where this-> is actually needed, or you're just ignorant. –  Jerry Coffin Nov 13 '12 at 20:07
    
@chris There are other circumstances where the method might be more complicated than a getter/setter. –  Ryan Amos Nov 13 '12 at 20:07
    
@RyanAmos, True, but the function name should always suffice to mostly know what it's doing. –  chris Nov 13 '12 at 20:08
7  
Using this-> to denote member variable access is merely a matter of style. You should be consistent in your style in a given project. Using a non-needed this-> as a convention in a project does not generate a defect, it just is a different convention. And yes, people get very religious about such conventions. –  Yakk Nov 13 '12 at 21:37

8 Answers 8

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Using this-> for class variables is perfectly acceptable.

However, don't start identifiers with an underscore, or include any identifiers with double underscore __ anywhere. There are some classes of reserved symbols that are easy to hit if you violate either of these two rules of thumb. (In particular, _IdentifierStartingWithACapital is reserved by the standard for compilers).

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1  
Identifiers starting with an underscore and a lower case letter are not reserved though, so this is not an issue. –  delnan Nov 13 '12 at 20:09
3  
IMO, "perfectly acceptable" is overstating things. The compiler won't complain, but you should write your code to be readable by other programmers, not just the compiler. From that viewpoint, it's clearly a bad practice and should definitely be avoided. –  Jerry Coffin Nov 13 '12 at 20:25
3  
The acceptance of this answer is an example of what Paul Simon once sang, "A man hears what he wants to hear and disregards the rest." –  John Dibling Nov 13 '12 at 21:11
2  
@John You would be confused if an entire project used this-> for all member variable access, and think they where documenting hidden member variable access each time? –  Yakk Nov 13 '12 at 21:40
1  
How would it be harder than in a codebase where this-> was not SOP? Compilers with decent warnings would still yell at you when you accessed a hiding variable. Ifyou are saying that you should avoid hiding member variables, that is good advice. But that is orthogonal to what the OP asked. –  Yakk Nov 13 '12 at 22:08

In principle, accessing members via this-> is a coding style that can help in making things clearer, but it seems to be a matter of taste.

However, you also seem to use prefixing members with _ (underscore). I would say that is too much, you should go for either of the two styles.

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4  
You should not prefix anything with an underscore. –  Dan Nov 13 '12 at 20:09
2  
I usually suffix my members with underscores. Prefixing can lead to use of a reserved name. –  chris Nov 13 '12 at 20:09
4  
@dan: It is perfectly fine to prefix members with a single underscore (if they don't start with a capital letter). These type of comments are called 'Cult Programming', indicate a misunderstanding of the rule and spread a misconception –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Nov 13 '12 at 20:15
    
@DavidRodríguez-dribeas, The as long as it doesn't start with a capital letter part is why I suffix them. It doesn't interfere with any name other than that which already ends with an underscore, but that's absurd name usage if you ask me. People coming from places such as C# might feel inclined to mix styles of capital letter public members (properties) and underscore prefixing. –  chris Nov 13 '12 at 20:18
    
I'm aware of reserved names. But I like prefixing all private members with _. So if I type this->_ auto-complete shows me all the private members in the current class. –  ilia choly Nov 13 '12 at 20:20

Are there any reasons I shouldn't do this?

Yes, there is a reason why you shouldn't do this.

Referencing a member variable with this-> is strictly required only when a name has been hidden, such as with:

class Foo
{
public:
    void bang(int val);
    int val;
};

void Foo::bang(int val)
{
    val = val;
}

int main()
{
    Foo foo;
    foo.val = 42;
    foo.bang(84);
    cout << foo.val;

}

The output of this program is 42, not 84, because in bang the member variable has been hidden, and val = val results in a no-op. In this case, this-> is required:

void Foo::bang(int val)
{
    this->val = val;
}

In other cases, using this-> has no effect, so it is not needed.

That, in itself, is not a reason not to use this->. The maintennance of such a program is however a reason not to use this->.

You are using this-> as a means of documentation to specify that the vairable that follows is a member variable. However, to most programmers, that's not what usign this-> actually documents. What using this-> documents is:

There is a name that's been hidden here, so I'm using a special technique to work around that.

Since that's not what you wanted to convey, your documentation is broken.

Instead of using this-> to document that a name is a member variable, use a rational naming scheme consistently where member variables and method parameters can never be the same.

Edit Consider another illustration of the same idea.

Suppose in my codebase, you found this:

int main()
{
    int(*fn)(int) = pingpong;
    (fn)(42);
}

Quite an unusual construct, but being a skilled C++ programmer, you see what's happening here. fn is a pointer-to-function, and being assigned the value of pingpong, whatever that is. And then the function pointed to by pingpong is being called with the singe int value 42. So, wondering why in the world you need such a gizmo, you go looking for pingpong and find this:

static int(*pingpong)(int) = bangbang;

Ok, so what's bangbang?

int bangbang(int val)
{
    cout << val;
    return val+1;
}

"Now, wait a sec. What in the world is going on here? Why do we need to create a pointer-to-function and then call through that? Why not just call the function? Isn't this the same?"

int main()
{
    bangbang(42);
}

Yes, it is the same. The observable effects are the same.

Wondering if that's really all there is too it, you see:

/*  IMPLEMENTATION NOTE
 *
 *  I use pointers-to-function to call free functions
 *  to document the difference between free functions
 *  and member functions.
 */

So the only reason we're using the pointer-to-function is to show that the function being called is a free function and not a member function.

Does that seem like just a "matter of style" to you? Because it seems like insanity to me.

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+1 for the over-the-top-yet-illustrative example. –  Mark B Nov 13 '12 at 22:42
    
pingpong should be const, no? –  Yakk Nov 13 '12 at 23:01

Here you will find:

Unless a class member name is hidden, using the class member name is equivalent to using the class member name with the this pointer and the class member access operator (->).

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Since you are already using a convention to signify that an identifer is a data member (although not one I would recommend), adding this-> is simply redundant in almost all cases.

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This is a somewhat subjective question obvously. this-> seems much more python-idiomatic than C++-idiomatic. There are only a handful of cases in C++ where the leading this-> is required, dealing with names in parent template classes. In general if your code is well organized it will be obvious to the reader that it's a member or local variable (globals should just be avoided), and reducing the amount to be read may reduce complexity. Additionally you can use an optional style (I like trailing _) to indicate member variables.

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I think you do this backwards. You want the code to assure you that what happens is exactly what is expected.

Why add extra code to point out that nothing special is happening? Accessing class members in the member functions happen all the time. That's what would be expected. It would be much better to add extra info when it is not the normal things that happen.

In code like this

class Foo
{
 public:
    void setBar(int NewBar) 
    { Bar = NewBar; }

you ask yourself - "Where could the Bar come from?".

As this is a setter in a class, what would it set if not a class member variable?! If it wasn't, then there would be a reason to add a lot of info about what's actually going on here!

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It doesn't actually harm anything, but programmers experienced with OO will see it and find it odd. It's similarly surprising to see "yoda conditionals," ie if (0 == x).

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Are you saying "Yoda conditionals" are odd, or they are not odd? –  Chad Nov 13 '12 at 20:12
    
Yoda ternary operations: ( a : b ? bool_expr ) –  Ryan Amos Nov 13 '12 at 20:16

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