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I have an array filled with positive int values, how could I normalize this list so the max value is always 100? Thank you in advance!

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4  
What have you tried? – ruakh Nov 13 '12 at 20:16
    
Be more specific. What do you do with the values? multiply/ get rid of them? Are you after a percentage, a ratio? – tonino.j Nov 13 '12 at 20:17
2  
You're going to have to be a little more specific, here. If you are normalizing values so that the maximum value is scaled down to equal exactly 100, then applying that scale to all of the other numbers is NOT going to leave them as integers. So are you looking to make the highest number scale to exactly 100, even though you'll then have floats, or are you looking to discard numbers higher than 100 (filter) or clamp all numbers greater than 100 to equal 100, and leave the rest alone (distorting the scale), or are you trying to do something else? – Norguard Nov 13 '12 at 20:19
up vote 15 down vote accepted

The idea is to first find the highest number in your array (using apply on Math.max), then find the ratio between that highest number and 100.

After that, it's just a matter of looping through your array and dividing all your numbers by that ratio:

var numbers = [3, 8, 45, 74, 123],
    ratio = Math.max.apply(Math, numbers) / 100,
    l = numbers.length,
    i;

for (i = 0; i < l; i++) {
    numbers[i] = Math.round(numbers[i] / ratio);
}

Here's the fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/XpRR8/


Note: I'm using Math.round to round the numbers to the nearest integer. If you instead prefer to keep them as floats, just remove the function call:

for ( i = 0; i < l; i++ ) {
    numbers[i] /= ratio;
}

Here's the fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/XpRR8/1/


If you don't have to support IE8 and below, you can use Array.prototype.map():

var numbers = [3, 8, 45, 74, 123],
    ratio = Math.max.apply(Math, numbers) / 100;

numbers = numbers.map(function (v) {
    return Math.round(v / ratio);
});

Here's the fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/XpRR8/2/


If you do support IE8, but are anyhow using jQuery, you can use $.map() instead:

numbers = $.map(numbers, function (v) {
    return Math.round(v / ratio);
});

Here's the fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/XpRR8/3/


Update: As pointed out by @wvxvw in the comments below, if you're concerned about fringe implementations that impose an artificial limit on the amount of arguments apply will handle, then use a loop instead of Math.max.apply. Here's an example (assuming neither Array.prototype.map nor $.map are available):

var numbers = [3, 8, 45, 74, 123],
    ratio = 0,
    i = numbers.length;

while (i--) numbers[i] > ratio && (ratio = numbers[i]);

ratio /= 100;
i = numbers.length;

while (i--) numbers[i] = Math.round(numbers[i] / ratio);

Here's the fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/XpRR8/4/


If you're using ES6, this becomes laughably simple:

var numbers = [3, 8, 45, 74, 123];
var ratio = Math.max(...numbers) / 100;

numbers = numbers.map(v => Math.round(v / ratio));
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for detailed answer. – Shmiddty Nov 13 '12 at 20:49
    
@wvxvw - Interesting. Here's a test using apply with 10,000 elements, and it works flawlessly in all major browsers; I even tested it in the 5 latest IE browsers (6-10). Being that the difference in performance seems to lean towards apply, (and in IE < 9 the difference is staggering), I'd suggest sticking with apply. (Side note: Firefox seems to be using some crazy voodoo to achieve abnormal performance out of the loop method. Go figure). – Joseph Silber Nov 13 '12 at 23:59
    
@wvxvw - Although you're correct that my loop implementation wasn't the most efficient, using your loop doesn't change the picture much: older versions of IE (where, arguably, these optimizations are most needed) still favor apply by a large margin. – Joseph Silber Nov 14 '12 at 15:07
    
@wvxvw - Your normal-loop code is simply incorrect. It doesn't find the max number; it always returns array[array.length - 1]. I've created a third revision of the test, with similar results. – Joseph Silber Nov 14 '12 at 15:08

Like this

function Normalize(array, value)
{ 
 for( var i = 0, len = array.length; i < len; i++ )
 {
  if( parseInt(array[i]) > value) array[i] = value;
 }
}

And then use it:

var arr = [];
arr.push(101);
arr.push(5);
arr.push(6);
Normalize(arr,100);
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2  
I respect that you're trying to help but you just did someones work for them. :[ For the record I wasn't the -1. – Snuffleupagus Nov 13 '12 at 20:19
    
@Snuffleupagus - And to all the other answers? – Travis J Nov 13 '12 at 20:23
1  
I think var arr = [101, 5, 6] is simpler and more easy to read... Just saying. – Derek 朕會功夫 Nov 13 '12 at 20:29
    
@Derek - I think it is too, but I was trying to give the feel of perhaps different places appending to the array. – Travis J Nov 13 '12 at 20:32

Well, you can get the maximum value with Math.max.apply(arr), then either loop through or use arr.map to multiply all numbers by 100/max. Done.

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You need to find the maximum and scale all numbers to the target range.

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function normalize(arr, max) {
    // find the max value
    var m = 0;
    for(var x=0; x<arr.length; x++) m = Math.max(m, arr[x]);
    // find the ratio
    var r = max / m;
    // normalize the array
    for(var x=0; x<arr.length; x++) arr[x] = arr[x] * r;
    return arr;
}
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Just an edit to LastCoder code to support Negative numbers as well

function normalize(arr, max) {
    // find the max value
    var max = arr[0];
    var min = arr[0];
    for(var x=0; x<arr.length; x++) 
        max = Math.max(m, arr[x];
    for(var x=0; x<arr.length; x++) 
        min = Math.min(m, arr[x];

    // normalize the array
    for(var x=0; x<arr.length; x++) 
        arr[x] = (arr[x] - min) / (max - min);

    return arr;
}
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