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void g(int& a)
{
    std::cout<<"int&\n";
} 

void g(int a)
{
    std::cout<<"int\n";
}  

int main()
{    
    int a = 2;   
    g(a); //won't compile (at least under MSVC 2012)

    std::cin.ignore();
}

Is there a way to avoid ambiguous call error here ? something like g( static_cast<int&>(a) );

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1  
Which one do you want it to call? –  Robᵩ Nov 13 '12 at 20:46
    
with g( static_cast<int&>(a) ); I expected g(int& a) be called –  Guillaume07 Nov 13 '12 at 20:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

If you can cast, there is, of course a way to disambiguate the call:

g(const_cast<int const&>(a));

If you insist to call the reference version, the resolution is a bit more tricky:

static_cast<void(*)(int&)>(g)(a);
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2  
+1 for the cast to const (I didn't even think of that!), but -1 for using static_cast instead of const_cast, and in sum, 0. ;-) –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Nov 13 '12 at 21:03
    
@Cheersandhth.-Alf: Good point: I shall fix the answer to use the correct cast! –  Dietmar Kühl Nov 13 '12 at 21:06
    
He he, see my answer. :-) –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Nov 13 '12 at 21:09
    
static_cast<void(*)(int&)>(g)(a);: You've got to love a language as simple as C++ :) (+1) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Nov 13 '12 at 21:26
1  
Yes, for int it would. If the type isn't an int but, e.g., a std::string this use would move the object which may not entirely what you want. –  Dietmar Kühl Nov 13 '12 at 21:53

This answer relates to the question as it was when I answered.

The OP keeps adding to the question, and I'm not going to chase that…


Yes there is, and yes, you're right that it involves casting to resolve the ambiguity:

#include <iostream>

void g(int& a)
{
    std::cout<<"int&\n";
} 

void g(int a)
{
    std::cout<<"int\n";
}  

int main()
{    
    int a = 2;   
    static_cast< void(*)(int&) >( g )( a );
}

Note: to run this in Visual Studio and see the result window, either use [Ctrl F5], or place a breakpoint on the last right brace of main and run it in the debugger. But better, just run it from the command line. No need to add a “stop” at the end! :-)


AMENDMENT: Dietmar showed in his answer how to use a cast to const to call the by-value argument overload. I didn't even think of that, but if you want to do that (it's limited to cutting off the by-reference version from consideration), do use a const_cast instead of a static_cast.

Or better, just make an rvalue expression out of the argument, e.g. by adding a handy little + sign in front,

    g( +a );

:-)

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1  
It's true that disabling overload resolution like this works, but it's hardly ideal. It'll never be possible to call the naked function on an lvalue like this... –  Kerrek SB Nov 13 '12 at 20:55
    
kerrek, i'm unable to make sense of your comment. it think that means that it's meaningless. for example, it's hardly "ideal", well why make that comment to me instead of to the OP, who asks for this. or why not make it to yourself, since you added this solution when i showed you. jeez. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Nov 13 '12 at 20:58
    
@downvoter (kerrek, is that you?), please explain your downvote so that people can more readily see who you are. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Nov 13 '12 at 21:08
    
Not me, of course not -- I basically copied your answer to make mine complete ;-) –  Kerrek SB Nov 13 '12 at 21:46
    
What's to be upset about? I made the comment so the OP can find out that while his question does have a direct answer, the resulting code will not be very nice. –  Kerrek SB Nov 13 '12 at 21:49

For the purpose of overload resolution, binding to a reference of the correct type is an exact match, exactly like binding to a non-reference of the correct type, so the two overloads have identical priority with respect to an lvalue int argument.

You could make the second overload take a int const &, in which case it can be used in the exact same way but will be a distinct overload.

Alternatively, you could avoid overload resolution altogether by casting the function type:

static_cast<void(&)(int)>(g)(a);
static_cast<void(&)(int&)>(g)(a);

You would have to do this for every invocation of the function where there is an ambiguity, though (i.e. when passing an lvalue int).

This video is mandatory viewing for you.

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thanks for link –  Guillaume07 Nov 13 '12 at 20:47
    
-1 incorrect answer. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Nov 13 '12 at 20:49
    
@Cheersandhth.-Alf: Ah, I see. Fixed, thanks! –  Kerrek SB Nov 13 '12 at 20:51
    
Your answer is still technically incorrect, so I'm keeping the downvote. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Nov 13 '12 at 21:00
    

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