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This is the code I have right now. I can't get it to return the right results for the question.

def problem(n):
    myList = [1,n]
    for i in range(1,n):
        result = int(n ** .5) 
        new = n/result 
        i = i + 1 
        myList.append(new) 
    return myList 
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marked as duplicate by Anderson Green, Ed Staub, Hinata, aga, Ionică Bizău Dec 26 '13 at 8:06

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
Do you want a prime factorization, or a list of all the numbers which can divide n? –  mgilson Nov 13 '12 at 20:49
1  
The common efficient technique is called [Sieve of Eratosthenes (python example)][1]. [1]: stackoverflow.com/questions/3939660/… –  Candide Nov 13 '12 at 20:50
    
A simple but probably naive algorithm could use the modulo % operator, which gives you the remainder of a division. –  dupersuper Nov 13 '12 at 20:50
2  
Maybe you shouldn't manually increment i in the loop. –  Lev Levitsky Nov 13 '12 at 20:51
2  
@LevLevitsky Not that it matters anyways (changes are thrown away with each iteration) –  NullUserException Nov 13 '12 at 20:52
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4 Answers 4

Factors of n are all numbers that divide into n evenly. So i is a factor of n if n % i == 0.

You need to do is perform this test for each number from 1 to n, and if that condition is true append that number to your list.

If you have issues as you start to write this code, update your question with what you tried.

Note that the above approach is not the most efficient way to find factors, but it seems to me like this is just an exercise for a beginning programmer so a naive approach is expected.

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There are a few problems with your code. First of all you do not need to increment i as your for loop already does that. Secondly, using some basic math principles you only need to go through a range of numbers up to the square root of your passed in number. I will leave the second part for you to play and experiment with.

def problem(n):
    myList = []
    for i in range(1, n+1):
        if n % i == 0:
            myList.append(i)

    return myList

For a more advanced approach you can try list comprehensions which are very powerful but are usually better for smaller data sets.

def problem(n):
    return [x for x in range(1, n+1) if n % x == 0]
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use a list comprehension:

In [4]: num=120

In [5]: [x for x in range(2,int(num/2)+1) if num%x==0]
Out[5]: [2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 12, 15, 20, 24, 30, 40, 60]

In [6]: num=121

In [7]: [x for x in range(2,int(num/2)+1) if num%x==0]
Out[7]: [11]
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2  
Simple, clear, and scales horribly. –  Steven Rumbalski Nov 13 '12 at 20:55
    
@StevenRumbalski It looks like a homework assignment, so I think we're good on the scalability front. –  NullUserException Nov 13 '12 at 20:59
    
@StevenRumbalski I will admit, I laughed. –  kreativitea Nov 13 '12 at 21:01
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You only need to iterate from 1 to n ** 0.5 + 1, and your factors will be all i's, and n/i's you pick up along the way.

For example: factors of 10:

We only need to iterate from 1 to 4

i = 1 => 10 % 1 == 0, so factors: i = 1, 10 / i = 10

i = 2 => 10 % 2 == 0, so factors: i = 2, 10 / i = 5

i = 3 => 10 % 3 != 0, no factors

We don't need to go any further, the answer is 1, 2, 5, 10.

def problem(n):
    myList = []
    for i in xrange(1, int(n ** 0.5 + 1)):
        if n % i == 0:
            if (i != n/i):
                myList.append(i)
                myList.append(n / i)
            else:
                myList.append(i)
    return myList 

Result:

>>> problem(10)
[1, 10, 2, 5]
>>> problem(12)
[1, 12, 2, 6, 3, 4]
>>> problem(77)
[1, 77, 7, 11]
>>> problem(4)
[1, 4, 2]
>>> problem(64)
[1, 64, 2, 32, 4, 16, 8]
>>> len(problem(10 ** 12))
169
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1  
problem(4) # => [1, 4, 2, 2] –  NullUserException Nov 13 '12 at 21:06
    
@NullUserException, Good Point. Fixed. Thank You. –  Akavall Nov 13 '12 at 21:09
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