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When I do this:

{some code}
previouslyDeclaredFunction($variable);
{some code}

I can get previouslyDeclaredFunction() to work just fine.

But when I put it inside a new function:

function newFunction($variable){

echo $variable; //see if var passes in properly
{some code}
previouslyDeclaredFunction($variable);
{some code}

}

..then call:

newFunction($variable);

..all of a sudden it stops working EVEN THOUGH I am able to echo() the $variable from within newFunction() just fine, meaning newFunction() was called properly and $variable was passed in properly. Apparently, some stuff inside just won't work unless I remove the whole outer function. PreviouslyDeclaredFunction() is included in the php script and it does get called from within newFunction() but somehow treats $variable differently even though the echo() proves it is being passed in and is the exact same value it was before.

EDIT (ok here comes the REAL code):

$test_tag = "afro";
cacheBuilder($test_tag); //declaration of function

function cacheBuilder($test_tag) {

$images = array();
$tags = array();
$imagetype = 'Hair';
$per_page = 60;
$orderby_view = FALSE;

echo $test_tag; //this works so var is passed in fine


    $tags2 = $test_tag;
    $tags = explode(',', $test_tag);
    if( count($tags) == 1 && strlen($tags[0]) == 0 ) $tags = array();
    $tag_url = urlencode($tags2);

$cachename = dirname( __FILE__ ) . '/cache-fp/' . $imagetype . '-' . $per_page . '-' . $page . '-' . ($orderby_view ? 'by_view' : 'by_date') . $tag_url . '.json';

    $detailurl = get_option('image_detail_url');
    $detailurl .= (strstr($detailurl, '?') === FALSE ? '?' : '&');
    $json = array();
    $images = array();
    $posts = get_pix($imagetype, array('per_page' => $per_page, 'page' => $page, 'tags' => $tags), $orderby_view);


    foreach( $posts['attachments'] as $ii => $post ) {
        $ta = array();
        $meta = array();
        $imagesrclight2 = array();
        // BWP - Theater mode
        $ta['detail_url'] = $detailurl . 'uid=' . $post->post_author . '&img_id=' . $post->ID . '&theater';


        $meta = get_post_meta(get_the_ID(), 'image_tag', false);
        $ta['image_tags'] = implode(' ', $meta);


        $ta['attachment_image'] = wp_get_attachment_image($image->ID, 'thumbnail'); 
        $imagesrclight2 = wp_get_attachment_image_src($image->ID, array(150, 150)); 
        $ta['attachment_image_src'] = rawurlencode($imagesrclight2[0]);


        $images[] = $ta;
    }

    file_put_contents($cachename, json_encode($images));

}

This is a bit complicated, and it's Wordpress, so I hope this isn't totally confusing. While there are no errors, it looks like get_option and/or get_pix are failing inside the outer function. The json produced has no data in it. When I get rid of the outer function, I get json which is populated with data as it should.

share|improve this question
    
put real code, your question need more explain –  Mohammad Ahmad Nov 13 '12 at 21:06
    
Any error messages? Can we see the definition for previouslyDeclaredFunction? What about {some code}? –  Explosion Pills Nov 13 '12 at 21:07
1  
Let's see an actual working example, please. –  Matt Gibson Nov 13 '12 at 21:07
    
And "stops working" means...? –  Damien Pirsy Nov 13 '12 at 21:09
    
does $variable suddenly switch from value to a reference somewhere? –  Marc B Nov 13 '12 at 21:12

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I figured it out. For whatever reason, certain Wordpress functions like get_the_ID() fail when I put them inside the function. Not sure why, but when I get the post ID via other means aside from the WP function, the value comes in instead of being null.

share|improve this answer
    
The WordPress context makes all the difference. Code inside what they insidiously refer to as The Loop has access to a horrible set of global variables and internal pointer-driven data structures. WP's functions know how to work with this, but if that same function is called from within another function it loses it's parent's scope. –  sudowned Nov 14 '12 at 22:15
    
This is why WordPress is hell: it breaks with standard practices to establish its own internal practices, which are inconsistently documented and aren't always applicable. Huzzah. –  sudowned Nov 14 '12 at 22:16

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