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Wondering why this doesn't work. Insight appreciated.

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        List<int> foo = new List<int> { 1, 2, 3 };
        var myResult = MyTest<int>(foo);
    }

    private static List<int> MyTest<T>(List<T> input)
    {
        List<int> bar = new List<int> { 2, 3, 4 };
        return bar.Where(b => input.Contains(b)).ToList();
    }

Expected output from MyTest() is a List { 2, 3 }. However, the compiler reports two errors on input.Contains(b), as follows:

  1. Argument 1: cannot convert from 'int' to 'T'

  2. The best overloaded method match for 'System.Collections.Generic.List.Contains(T)' has some invalid arguments

This Where() clause works fine if I don't use generic lists.

This is a simplification of my real-world problem, so please don't get stuck on "why are you writing this?" The problem is the error and why it's occurring.

Revised for (hopefully) clarity:

namespace SandBox
{

class Foo
{
    public int FooInt { get; set; }
    public string FooString { get; set; }
}

class Program
{
    private static List<Foo> fooList = new List<Foo> {
            new Foo() {FooInt = 1, FooString = "A"},
            new Foo() {FooInt = 2, FooString = "B"},
            new Foo() {FooInt = 3, FooString = "C"}
    };

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        List<int> myIntList = new List<int> { 1, 2 };
        var myFirstResult = GetFoos<int>(myIntList);

        List<string> myStringList = new List<string> { "A", "B" };
        var mySecondResult = GetFoos<string>(myStringList);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Return a list of Foo objects that match the input parameter list
    /// </summary>
    private static List<Foo> GetFoos<T>(List<T> input)
    {
        //***
        // Imagine lots of code here that I don't want to duplicate in 
        // an overload of GetFoos()
        //***

        if (input is List<int>)
        {
            //Use this statement if a list of integer values was passed in
            return fooList.Where(f => input.Contains(f.FooInt));
        }
        else if (input is List<string>)
        {
            //Use this statement if a list of string values was passed in
            return fooList.Where(f => input.Contains(f.FooString));
        }
        else
            return null;
    }
}
}

The same compiler errors are reported on input.Contains(f.Property).

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3  
The only way this works is if input is List<int>, why are you using <T>? –  Austin Salonen Nov 13 '12 at 21:19
5  
Sidenote: return bar.Intersect(input); would be more efficient. –  Tim Schmelter Nov 13 '12 at 21:21
1  
Because T is not int in general, and inside function at compile time you cannot assume T is int. –  Tengiz Nov 13 '12 at 21:22
2  
As Austin pointed, it works only with int. Consider if it was possible to compile and someone called MyTest<string>(someStrings) –  Sergey Berezovskiy Nov 13 '12 at 21:22
    
can you please post a more extended version of your problem, because in this way the question makes no sense –  user287107 Nov 13 '12 at 21:24
show 1 more comment

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Try this:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    List<int> foo = new List<int> { 1, 2, 3 };
    var myResult = MyTest<int>(foo);
}

private static List<int> MyTest<T>(List<T> input)
{
    List<int> bar = new List<int> { 2, 3, 4 };
    return bar.Where(b => input.OfType<int>().Contains(b)).ToList();
}

The problem is that at the compiler has no idea what type T is. Since T could be anything you can't call a method which expects an int (input.Contains).

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1  
Surely changing MyTest<T>(List<T> input) to MyTest<int>(List<int> input) is preferable! –  Trevor Pilley Nov 13 '12 at 21:22
    
If you know input is always going to be List<int>, then sure. If you don't (and I assume that's the reason for making it generic in the first place) then it would be better to cater for different types of input. –  Ian Newson Nov 13 '12 at 21:25
    
Thanks, Ian. Spot on. –  Matt Skone Nov 13 '12 at 22:57
add comment

input should be a List<int>

and then, whenever you call the function, if T is not an int, you'll know that it will always return an empty list anyway.

the function doesn't make very much sense when T is not an int.

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Just look at this function in isolation.

private static List<int> MyTest<T>(List<T> input)
{
    List<int> bar = new List<int> { 2, 3, 4 };
    return bar.Where(b => input.Contains(b)).ToList();
}

What if T were object... or string.. there's nothing stopping T from being those types. If T were one of those types, the statement input.Contains(b) would not make sense.

The compiler is complaining because you are allowing types that do not make sense with the statements in the method body.

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add comment

also another solution

static void MainT(string[] args)
{
    List<int> foo = new List<int> { 1, 2, 3 };
    var myResult = MyTest<int>(foo);
}

private static List<int> MyTest<T>(List<T> input) where T : IEquatable<int>
{
    List<int> bar = new List<int> { 2, 3, 4 };
    return bar.Where(b => input.Any(i => i.Equals(b))).ToList();
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is a fantastic answer. Never thought of using IEquatable<int> in the signature. The inner LINQ query (i => ...) is also very smooth and readable. –  Reacher Gilt Nov 13 '12 at 21:34
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The compiler can't guarantee that any <T> -- any <T> , DateTime, object, whatever -- will be castable to an int. That's why you're getting your first error.

In some circumstance you might be able to specify a kind of object in the signature of your function:

 private static List<int> MyTest<T>(List<T> input)  where T : someObject

This won't work for your case because int is a struct. You can work with it in a lot of other ways (other answers given outline some great methods), but you'll have to adjust your current strategy in some way.

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1  
T can't be object the way you put it. Object class is sealed –  nawfal Nov 13 '12 at 21:32
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