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I have a Java class called Game which has a non-static integer called score.

I would like to implement a static method which would increase the score of each Game object by 1, named increaseAllScore(). Is this possible? Could I simulate something like this or is there any way around this?

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7 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You could do it with an implementation like this:

int score;
static int scoremodifier;

public static void increaseAllScore() {
    scoremodifier++;
}

public int getScore() {
    return score + Game.scoremodifier;
}
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That's what I was thinking. I guess I'll go with this. I thought there would be something cooler. Thanks! –  n00b Nov 13 '12 at 21:40
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It is not possible; first learn the basics of Object-Oriented Programming.

As a work-adound you could hold a reference to all the Games:

public class Game {
    private static List<Game> allGames = new ArrayList<Game>();

    public Game createNewGame() {
        Game game = new Game();
        allGames.add(game); 
        return game;
    }

    public static void increaseAllGames() {
        for (Game game : games) {
            game.increaseScore(); 
        }
    }    
}

This is just an implementation example; for design I would not place them in the same class.

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You can only do this if your increaseAllScore method has static access to instances of Game (you might pass in a list in arguments, or have a statically stored list).

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This is possible, but needs some bookkeeping. In essence, you have to keep a static set of pointers to all existing games. In a game's constructor, you need to add it to this list, and you need to remove it again in the destructor.

A probably better way would be to have a static variable called scoreOffset or similar. Then, you can calculate an game's score by taking the instance score and adding the static scoreOffset.

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This would be an outline of a solution to your problem:

static final List<Game> games = new ArrayList<>();

public class Game {
  public Game() {
    games.add(this);
  }
}

public static void increaseAllScore() {
  for (Game g : games) game.increaseScore();
}
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It's technically possible but it's generally a bad design*. Instead create a container for all your games (call it class Games) that will hold references to all created Game instances. Most likely Games class will have a createGame() method to fully control the lifecycle of all created games.

Once you have Games class, it can have non-static increaseAllScores() method that will basically iterate over all created Game instances and increase score of all of them one-by-one.

* - make a static List<Game> of all instances and modify that list inside Game constructor.

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The only way to do this is to provide a mechanism for the static method to access a reference to the Game object(s). One way to do this is to have each Game object register itself in a static data structure.

For instance, you might do this:

public class Game {
    private static Set<WeakReference<Game>> registeredGames
        = new HashSet<WeakReference<Game>>();
    private int score;

    public Game() {
        // construct the game
        registeredGames.add(new WeakReference(this));
    }

    . . .

    public static incrementAllScores() {
        for (WeakReference<Game> gameRef : registeredGames) {
            Game game = gameRef.get();
            if (game != null) {
                game.score++;
            }
        }
    }
}

I'm using a WeakReference<Game> here so that the set doesn't prevent the game from being garbage-collected when there are no other references to it.

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+1, good idea to use weak reference –  bobah Nov 13 '12 at 21:44
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