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So imagine we have a situation like this:

public class Bar1 {
    public final int VALUE1; 
    public final double VALUE2;
    public final String NAME; 
    /*DOZENS OF FINALS!*/

    public Bar1(int v1, double v2, String name)
    {
        this.VALUE1 = v1; 
        this.VALUE2 = v2;
        this.NAME = name; 
    }

}

and

public class Foo1
{
    private Bar1 bar1;
    private Bar1 bar2;
    private Bar1 bar3;
    /*Dozens of bars!*/

    public Foo1( //We need to pass the values in here)
                 {
                     bar1 = new Bar1( //we need to initialise each of the bars. )
                     bar2 =...
                     bar3 = ...
                 }


}

What's a good way of doing this? I think passing each one in as it's own argument,

eg:

public class Foo1
{
    private Bar1 bar1;
    private Bar1 bar2;
    private Bar1 bar3;
    /*Dozens of bars!*/

    public Foo1(int bar1Value1, double bar1Value2, String bar1String, 
                        int bar2Value1, double bar2Value2, String bar2String,
                        int bar3Value1, double bar3Value2, String bar3String)
                 {
                     bar1 = new Bar1(bar1Value1, bar1Value2, bar1String);
                     bar2 = new Bar1(bar2Value1, bar2Value2, bar2String);
                     bar3 = new Bar1(bar3Value1, bar3Value2, bar3String);
                 }


}

is a huge pain in the ass.

I'll post the solution I've come up with, but I'm wondering what other solutions there are.

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1  
53% accept rate and "i'll post the solution I've come up with"? yeah, sure... –  Pere Villega Nov 13 '12 at 21:46
    
Just don't make them final and instead use a builder. –  Adam Nov 13 '12 at 21:47
1  
Have you considered the Builder pattern? (Ps this is not a quiz site - you should give all the relevant information). –  assylias Nov 13 '12 at 21:48
    
@Adam: Why not make them final? A builder is precisely useful to build immutable objects with final fields. –  JB Nizet Nov 13 '12 at 21:48
    
@Adam Builder pattern can coexist with final fields. –  assylias Nov 13 '12 at 21:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Separate out your types. If you have dozens of fields, it's almost certain that either:

  • Some of those fields are related to each other, so should be captured in their own type, e.g. if you have fields address1, address2, address3, city, state then that should be an Address type

  • Some of the fields aren't related at all, and shouldn't be in the same type to start with

I have never seen a well-designed class with dozens of fields.

Once you've cut down the number of fields, you won't have a problem with an unwieldy constructor.

If you do still have a lot of fields, the builder pattern (as mentioned in comments) is indeed good, if a little tedious: have a mutable builder type (often a nested type), and then a build() method which passes the builder itself to the constructor of the immutable type, which copies the values from the builder into the final fields.

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The problem is that the arguements still add up. I'll explain using the code I'm actually trying to do: I have a Parameter class (the bars) which has MIN MAX DEFAULT and NAME. Then I have a various components (a foo) that have varying numbers of Parameters, for example Oscillator has Frequency, Phase, Amp, Fourier, Curve, Slope, Width. I don't want to store the final in the Oscillator class, because I'm not actually sure then what the MAX for frequency should be. That should be determined by the application that is using it. –  dwjohnston Nov 13 '12 at 22:59
    
@user1068446: That wasn't really a very clear explanation - which final do you not want to store? You definitely shouldn't have frequencyMin, frequencyMax, frequencyDefault, frequencyName, etc. It sounds like Oscillator could have six fields, but that's not so bad... –  Jon Skeet Nov 14 '12 at 6:55
    
MIN, MAX, DEFAULT, NAME are all finals of the Parameter class. - You get that for a single oscillator - I need to somewhere enter 6*4 = 24 values somewhere right? The question is - how do I easily tell the Oscillator what it's MIN and MAX, etc values are for each of it's parameters? –  dwjohnston Nov 14 '12 at 8:46
    
Meta question here: should I perhaps just edit my question to include the actual code I'm using? –  dwjohnston Nov 14 '12 at 8:49
    
@user1068446: You pass in the 6 Parameter values, which you construct separately. That's the point. Instead of passing in 24 arguments in one enormous call, you break it up. –  Jon Skeet Nov 14 '12 at 9:07

My Solution. Pass the values in as a 2d array of Strings, and covert each of the String to it's corresponding type.

public class Foo1
{
    private Bar1 bar1;
    private Bar1 bar2;
    private Bar1 bar3;

    public Foo1(String[][] values)
    {
        Bar1[] bars = {bar1, bar2, bar3};

        for (int i = 0; i<3; i++)
        {
            bars[i] = new Bar1(Integer.parseInt(values[i][0]), Double.parseDouble(values[i][1]), values[i][2]); 

        }


    }

}




public class FooBar1 {

    private static final String[][] myFoo1Values = {
            //Value1, Value2, Name
            //Integer, Double, String
            {"1", "2.22", "bar 1"},
            {"2", "5.59", "BAR TWO"},
            {"333", "2", "- tre"}
    };

    static private Foo1 myFoo1; 

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub

        myFoo1 = new Foo1(myFoo1Values);

    }

}
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