Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I seem to be getting a 403:

HTTP/1.1 403 Server failed to authenticate the request. Make sure the value of Authorization header is formed correctly including the signature.

This happens when I use set the HttpWebRequest.DefaultCachingPolicy in the app.config as follows:

<system.net>
 <requestCaching defaultPolicyLevel="Default" isPrivateCache="false">
  <defaultHttpCachePolicy policyLevel="Default"/>
 </requestCaching>
</system.net>

I'm doing this because I have legacy code which I do not control that is calling an API to blob storage that I have provided as if it were a file system (up to 58 identical calls per file). Clearly this is not ideal. Using default HTTP style caching is a behavior I would like as it would cause my application to only download the file when it's modified.

The issue seems to occur every other request (e.g. it appears to be happening when the request is cached and the server is checking to see if the server content has changed).

The only difference between the requests that fail and the requests that succeed seems to be the inclusion of:

If-None-Match: "<a blob etag>"
If-Modified-Since: <a date>

I've looked at the code for the .net API (which I'm using) on github for 1.7.1 and assuming it hasn't changed from SDK 1.6 (what I'm currently using), it should work fine.

Any help is very appreciated

UPDATE: I've written some repro code to assist:

Uses: .NET 4.0, Windows Azure SDK 1.6

using System;
using System.Net;
using System.Net.Cache;
using Microsoft.WindowsAzure;
using Microsoft.WindowsAzure.StorageClient;

namespace AzureStorageProb
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            const string accountKey = "<azure storage account key>";
            const string account = "<azure storage account name>";
            const string testBlob = "<blob path to test file>";
            var cloudStorageAccount = 
               new CloudStorageAccount(
                  new StorageCredentialsAccountAndKey(account, accountKey),
                  useHttps: true);
            var cloudBlobClient = cloudStorageAccount.CreateCloudBlobClient();
            HttpWebRequest.DefaultCachePolicy = 
               new HttpRequestCachePolicy(HttpRequestCacheLevel.Default);

            try
            {
                var blob = cloudBlobClient.GetBlobReference(testBlob);
                blob.FetchAttributes();
                blob.DownloadByteArray();
                Console.WriteLine("First attempt worked!");
            }
            catch (StorageClientException ex)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(ex);
            }

            try
            {
                var blob = cloudBlobClient.GetBlobReference(testBlob);
                blob.FetchAttributes();
                blob.DownloadByteArray();
                Console.WriteLine("Second attempt worked!");
            }
            catch (StorageClientException ex)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(ex);
            }
            Console.ReadKey();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

So it turns out the culprit is BlobRequest.SignRequest(request, creds); A quick peek at the documentation indicates that the If-None-Match and If-Modified-Since are both used as part of the calculation for the Authentication header that call adds. Because those headers are added AFTER the Authentication header is computed by WINInet (a presumption). Either way the end result is that the checksum provided by the Authentication header is now invalid. Thus causing the 403 Forbidden.

Work Arounds:

  • Manually cache items locally
  • Fix the Calling code (probably the best long term solution)
  • Use the rest interface VERY carefully (experimentation has shown this to be dangerous for the same reasons, using the 'Shared Key Lite' gets around this in some circumstances)
  • Use a regular WebRequest to get files (this means you have to expose them to the internet, either via shared key or otherwise)

I'm not going to say that Azure Blob Storage is broken... but I will say that it is not truly RESTful as it cannot comply with HTTP semantics correctly.

share|improve this answer

The reason this is failing as implemented is that the signature that is calculated includes the request date, as well as the conditional headers (if match, if none match, if modified since, etc.) to prevent replay or man in the middle attacks. As such when a cached request is sent the authentication fails. Currently there does not appear to be a way to hook into the default HTTP cache and alter headers in order to update this signature, as such the SharedKey and SharedKeyLite authentication schemes will not work for this scenario. However, you can make use of SharedAccessSignatures (http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windowsazure/ee395415.aspx) to pre-authenticate a given URI for some period of time. This will no longer require a signature unique to each request.

Example

SharedAccessBlobPolicy policy = new SharedAccessBlobPolicy()
{
     Permissions = SharedAccessBlobPermissions.Read,

     // Add delta to account for clock skew
     SharedAccessStartTime = DateTime.Now.AddMinutes(-5),
     SharedAccessExpiryTime = DateTime.Now.AddMinutes(15)
};

HttpWebRequest.DefaultCachePolicy = new HttpRequestCachePolicy(HttpCacheAgeControl.MaxAge, TimeSpan.FromSeconds(10));
CloudBlockBlob sasdBlob = new CloudBlockBlob(new Uri(rootBlob.Uri.ToString() + rootBlob.GetSharedAccessSignature(policy)));

OperationContext cacheCtx = new OperationContext();
cacheCtx.ResponseReceived += (o, a) => Console.WriteLine("{0} : {1}", a.RequestInformation.HttpStatusCode, a.Response.IsFromCache);

for (int m = 0; m < 100; m++)
{
     sasdBlob.DownloadToStream(Stream.Null, null, null, cacheCtx);
     Thread.Sleep(1000);

     if (m == 10)
     {
          // invalidate data updating properties
          rootBlob.Metadata.Add("hello", "cache");
          rootBlob.SetMetadata();
     }
}

This will output:

200 : False

200 : True

200 : True

200 : True

200 : True

200 : True

200 : True

200 : True

200 : True

200 : True

200 : True

200 : False

200 : True

...

We will be looking at better ways to expose this functionality without such workarounds in the future.

Read This!

Whenever you are using SharedAccessSignatures you are essentially publishing the key inside the URI itself. As such there are some security best practices that should be followed.

  1. If you are running outside of the DC or over a link that may be monitored use HTTPS to prevent malicious actors from abusing the signature.
  2. The Example above calculates a simple policy that is not tied to a Container ACL, as such the only way to revoke it is to rotate your storage keys. Whenever possible please associate SAS signatures to a container policy. In this case if a SAS Uri is ever leaked / abused you can revoke it by simply deleting the policy on the relevant container. For more on how to do this see: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windowsazure/jj721951.aspx
  3. All SAS traffic counts towards a given accounts SLA and Billing, as such only share SAS URIs with trusted clients.

I hope this helps, let me know if you have any additional questions,

/Joe

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.