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This is my declarative model:

import datetime
from sqlalchemy import Column, Integer
from sqlalchemy.ext.declarative import declarative_base

Base = declarative_base()

class Test(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'test'

    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    created_date = DateTime(default=datetime.datetime.utcnow)

However, when I try to import this module, I get this error:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "orm/models2.py", line 37, in <module>
    class Test(Base):
  File "orm/models2.py", line 41, in Test
    created_date = sqlalchemy.DateTime(default=datetime.datetime.utcnow)
TypeError: __init__() got an unexpected keyword argument 'default'

If I use an Integer type, I can set a default value. What's going on?

share|improve this question
up vote 41 down vote accepted

DateTime doesn't have a default key as an input. The default key should be an input to the Column function. Try this:

import datetime
from sqlalchemy import Column, Integer, DateTime
from sqlalchemy.ext.declarative import declarative_base

Base = declarative_base()

class Test(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'test'

    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    created_date = Column(DateTime, default=datetime.datetime.utcnow)
share|improve this answer
1  
Wow, knew it would boneheaded. Thanks. – Brandon O'Rourke Nov 13 '12 at 23:05
    
This isn't right. The timestamp at model load will be used for all new records rather than the time the record is added. – SkyLeach Feb 9 at 16:18

You can also use sqlalchemy builtin function for default DateTime

from sqlalchemy.sql import func

DT = Column(DateTime(timezone=True), default=func.now())
share|improve this answer
1  
You can also use server_default instead of default so value will by handled by database itself. – rgtk Jun 6 '15 at 14:55

The default keyword parameter should be given to the Column object.

Example:

Column(u'timestamp', TIMESTAMP(timezone=True), primary_key=False, nullable=False, default=time_now),
share|improve this answer

For sanity, you probably want to have all datetimes calculated by your DB server, rather than the application server. Calculating the timestamp in the application can lead to problems because network latency is variable, clients experience slightly different clock drift, and different programming languages occasionally calculate time slightly differently.

SQLAlchemy allows you to do this by passing func.now() or func.current_timestamp() (they are aliases of each other) which tells the DB to calculate the timestamp itself.

Additionally, for a default where you're already telling the DB to calculate the value, it's generally better to use server_default instead of default. This tells SQLAlchemy to pass the default value as part of the CREATE TABLE statement.

For example, if you write an ad hoc script against this table, using server_default means you won't need to worry about manually adding a timestamp call to your script--the database will set it automatically.

SQLAlchemy also supports onupdate so that anytime the row is updated it inserts a new timestamp. Again, best to tell the DB to calculate the timestamp itself:

from sqlalchemy.sql import func

time_created = Column(DateTime(timezone=True), server_default=func.now())
time_updated = Column(DateTime(timezone=True), onupdate=func.now())

There is a server_onupdate parameter, but unlike server_default, it doesn't actually set anything serverside. It just tells SQLalchemy that your database will change the column when an update happens (perhaps you created a trigger on the column ), so SQLAlchemy will ask for the return value so it can update the corresponding object.

share|improve this answer
    
I totally agree with you. However, my setup does not work. ``` class TimestampMixin(object): created_at = Column('created_at', DateTime(timezone=True), default=func.now()) updated_at = Column('updated_at', DateTime(timezone=True), default=func.now(), onupdate=func.now()) ``` I issued a create and an update statement 1 second apart. The two values for created_at and updated_at are always the same. – Khanh Hua Jan 8 at 2:16
    
IIRC, in PostgreSQL, if you issue both of them within the same DB transaction the timestamps will both be from the transaction start time. Not sure about other DB's. You may also not have flushed and/or committed the SQLAlchemy session in between the create/update statement. If not either of those, then it will be far easier to debug if you open a new question. Feel free to include a link here and I'll take a look. – Jeff Widman Jan 8 at 4:52

[enter link description here][1]

You likely want to use onupdate=datetime.now so that UPDATEs also change the last_updated field.

[1]: SQLAlchemy has two defaults for python executed functions.

  • default sets the value on INSERT, only once
  • onupdate sets the value to the callable result on UPDATE as well.
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