Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I thought I can make life a little easier in data statistics by making a small program which returns the results of sampling distribution of the mean (with standard error). It does this part successfully but in an attempt to return the z-score by using the formula I found here, it returns -1#IND. My interpretation of that formula is:

((1 / (sqrt(2 * pi) * stdev)) * pow(e, (normalpow))

where

double normalpow = -0.5 * ((mean - popmean) * (mean-popmean) / stdev)

I did a little more investigating and found that (mean - popmean) * (mean - popmean) was evaluating to 0 no matter what. How can I get around this problem of normalpow evaluating to 0.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <sstream>
#include <math.h>


using namespace std;

double number  ;
double mean ;
double popmean ;
double stdev ;
double square = 2;
double e = 2.71828182845904523536;
double pi = 3.14159265358979323846;
double normalpow = -0.5*((mean-popmean)*(mean-popmean)/stdev);
int main ()
{
    string continuer ;
    do
    {
        cout << "Enter Sample Mean: " << endl;
        cin >> mean;
        cout << "Enter Population Mean: " << endl;
        cin >> popmean;
        cout << "Enter Standard Deviation: " << endl;
        cin >> stdev;
        cout << "Enter Sample Size: " << endl;
        cin >> number;
        if (stdev == 0)
            cout << ((mean-popmean)/(number))<< endl;
        else
        {
            cout << ((mean-popmean)/((stdev)/(sqrt(number))))<< endl;
            cout << ((1/(sqrt(2*pi)*stdev))*pow(e, (normalpow)))<< endl;
        }
        cout << "If you want to continue, Press Y" << endl ;
        cin >> continuer;
    } while (continuer == "Y" || continuer == "y") ;
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
so what are mean and popmean? –  Useless Nov 13 '12 at 22:59
1  
What variable types are mean and popmean? May need to cast them as floats or doubles to avoid integer truncation. –  madeFromCode Nov 13 '12 at 23:01
    
I set mean and popmean as a double for now. My test subject was 9 for mean and 10 for popmean. –  Hayden Nov 13 '12 at 23:02
    
If you are using ints to perform some operations like division, you should know that the result will be truncated, so, for example after int a = 1/2, a will store 0. The same will happen in this case: double b = 1/2, because you are performing a division between integers and casting the result to a double (implicitly). One way to solve this issue is using, for example double b = 1.0/2.0, which will make a division between double –  Daniel Castro Nov 13 '12 at 23:03
    
Have you set a breakpoint and verified the values are what you expect? You could also try -0.5f instead of -0.5 just to be explicit. –  madeFromCode Nov 13 '12 at 23:05
show 3 more comments

4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted
using namespace std;

double number  ;
double mean ;
double popmean ;
double stdev ;
double square = 2;
double e = 2.71828182845904523536;
double pi = 3.14159265358979323846;
double normalpow = -0.5*((mean-popmean)*(mean-popmean)/stdev);

These are all variables with static storage duration, so those without explicit initialisers are initialised to 0.

Hence mean, popmean and stdev are all 0 when normalpow is initialised, and that initialisation results in

double normalpow = -0.5*(0.0*0.0/0.0);

which gives a NaN.

You never change normalpow afterwards, so any computation involving it results in a NaN.

share|improve this answer
    
Fair enough. Should I declare the function later in the body of the code because all the values gets defined there? –  Hayden Nov 13 '12 at 23:20
    
Yes, or you should take juanchopanza's advice and define a real function to get normalpow. –  Daniel Fischer Nov 13 '12 at 23:21
    
That works actually. I am an idiot for not noticing that. Thanks. –  Hayden Nov 13 '12 at 23:21
add comment

Your problem is here:

double normalpow = -0.5*((mean-popmean)*(mean-popmean)/stdev);

At this point, mean, popmean and stdev have garbage values because they haven't been initialized. It sounds like what you want is a function.

double normalPow(double mean, double popmean, double stddev)
{
  return -0.5*((mean-popmean)*(mean-popmean)/stdev);
}

Then call it in your main:

double normalpow = normalPow(mean, popmean, stdev);

Of course, you should check for stdev equal or close to 0. in the function.

share|improve this answer
    
Ooo nice bit of advice there as well. –  Hayden Nov 13 '12 at 23:24
add comment

This depends on how mean and popmean are calculated. mean - popmean evaluates to zero, if they are identical: mean == popmean.

share|improve this answer
    
The thing is I swapped them around so that it was (popmean-mean)*(popmean-mean) and it has the same results. –  Hayden Nov 13 '12 at 23:03
    
Of course, if mean == popmean, then mean - popmean == popmean - mean. That's not surprising. How and where do you calculate both numbers? –  Olaf Dietsche Nov 13 '12 at 23:05
add comment

And the formula you are using is not correct cause you are not calculating the square of the standard deviation.

share|improve this answer
    
I thought the two (mean-popmean)*(mean-popmean) was squared. –  Hayden Nov 13 '12 at 23:14
    
Yes it is but you should also do " pow(stdv,2)". –  hekri Nov 13 '12 at 23:16
    
Ohhh yes I see. –  Hayden Nov 13 '12 at 23:17
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.