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I'm new to regex and I am having some trouble. I'm trying the get everything between {{#user_data?}} and {{/user_data?}}

$content = '
{{#user_data?}}
<span class="hello">
Hello, {{username}}!
</span>
{{/user_data?}}';

$key = 'user_data?';
$regex = '/\{\{#'.$key.'\}\}(.*?)\{\{\/'.$key.'\}\}/';
if (preg_match_all($regex, $content, $matches))
{
print_r($matches);
}
else
echo 'no match found';

What am I doing wrong?

share|improve this question
2  
Writing your own template parser? There are so many good ones already... – Wesley Murch Nov 13 '12 at 23:13
4  
You did not escape the ?. If left as meta character, it will make matching for the a optional.` – mario Nov 13 '12 at 23:13
    
@WesleyMurch Yes, I call it: PHP. It's the template language per se. – Dan Lee Nov 13 '12 at 23:15
    
@DanLee: There are good reasons to use a template parser, one of which is sandboxing allowed code (if you don't want designers accidentally or purposely running unlink('index.php') or other such nonsense). Another is language-independent templates (look at Mustache for an extreme example), and of course there are so many more reasons you could write a book on the subject. People who say "just use PHP" perhaps have not encountered these problems. – Wesley Murch Nov 13 '12 at 23:16
1  
@WesleyMurch Yes there may be good reasons to use a template parser, I agree. But in many cases you buy yourself overhead and some pseudo-language on top, where you could just stick to PHP itself, as it brings great templating features out of the box. – Dan Lee Nov 13 '12 at 23:21
up vote 2 down vote accepted

In addition to comments' "not escaping ? sign", you also need proper modifiers:

$content = <<<STR
{{#user_data?}}
<span class="hello">
Hello, {{username}}!
</span>
{{/user_data?}}
STR;

$key = 'user_data\?';
$regex = '/\{\{#'.$key.'\}\}(.*?)\{\{\/'.$key.'\}\}/sim';
preg_match_all($regex, $content, $matches,PREG_SET_ORDER);
print_r($matches);

This will output:

Array
(
    [0] => Array
        (
            [0] => {{#user_data?}}
<span class="hello">
Hello, {{username}}!
</span>
{{/user_data?}}
            [1] => 
<span class="hello">
Hello, {{username}}!
</span>

        )

)

i is not necessary, and should be removed if you need case-sensitive template;

m may be unnecessary too, according to PHP Document about PCRE modifiers;

s is a must, so you can match multiline string with dot.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so much! I'm going to have to do some more research on modifiers. – Kyle Piontek Nov 15 '12 at 18:17

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