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First off, I am using my own Process Wrapper to hold the starting path of a process.

public class MCProcess()
{
       public Process Process { get; set;}
       public string  StartingPath { get; set;}

       public MCProcess(string start, Process p)
       {
             Process = p;
             StartingPath = start;
       }
}

Now, I keep have a List<MCProcces> called runningProcesses that I use to keep track of all the processes and starting paths of every process that my program has started.

For Example:

string path = "C:\\Windows\\System32\\notepad.exe";
Process temp = Process.Start(path);
runningProcesses.Add(new MCProcess(path, temp));

Now, sometimes, I want to close processes that I have run. Instead of looking through the task manager and trying to find the MainModuleName of each process that I started, I included the StartingPath for a reason.

If I want to close a notepad, I just loop through my runningProcesses, find out which process has the startingPath for notepad and then use Process.Kill to kill that process.

string path = "C:\\Windows\\System32\\notepad.exe";
for (int i = 0; i < runningProcesses.Count; i++)
{
     if (runningProcesses[i].StartingPath == path)
     {
          runningProcesses[i].Process.Kill();
          runningProcesses.RemoveAt(i);
     }
}

This code works beautiful on Windows 7 and I have had no issues at all. However, when using this on Windows XP, I get an ArgumentNullException with Process.Kill.

Is there something about the Process class that doesn't make it work well on Windows XP?

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1  
Have you verified runningProcesses[i] isn't actually null, and figured out, how to void running into a null reference. –  Ramhound Nov 14 '12 at 0:17
    
@Ramhound Yes, runningProcess[i] is not null. –  Kyle Uithoven Nov 14 '12 at 4:04
    
You are getting a null expecton which means runningProcesses[i] actually is null. –  Ramhound Nov 14 '12 at 13:19
    
@Ramhound Without multiple threads how can runningProcesses[i] be null when runningProcesses[i].StartingPath doesn't throw an ArgumentNullException? –  Justin Nov 14 '12 at 13:32
    
The Process class doesn't have a static Kill method which means that the above code can't be right - can you copy and paste the actual code? –  Justin Nov 14 '12 at 13:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Amazed how this is working in win 7. You are modifying a collection while using it in loop. You should maintain index of processes to be deleted, and then once done with the loop, remove all the processes

Try something like

var processesToRemove = runningProcesses.Where (p => String.Equals(p.StartingPath, path);
foreach(var process in processToRemove)
{
  process.Process.Kill();
  runningProcesses.Remove(process);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Modifying a collection while looping through it is 100% fine as long as you are not enumerating through it. In this case the worst thing to happen is that the item after the killed process would be skipped, which is easily fixed with an i-- –  Justin Nov 14 '12 at 13:34
    
Exactly. I agree with you, and had commented in the context of this question (not a generalized one). .NET takes care of it through foreach/IEnumerable. But Developer should be careful enough not to abuse it in other looping constructs. Such bugs are difficult to find and repro. (Of course not saying it is wrong everywhere, it depends upon the context) –  Tilak Nov 14 '12 at 13:52

Try making your properties public:

Public Process Process { get; set;}
Public string  StartingPath { get; set;}

Then kill your process like this:

for (int i = 0; i < runningProcesses.Count; i++)
{
    if (runningProcesses[i].StartingPath == path)
    {
          runningProcesses[i].Process.Kill();
    }
}
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