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I'm very much a perl newbie, so bear with me.

I was looking for a way to recurse through folders in OS X and came across this solution: How to traverse all the files in a directory...

I modified perreal's answer (see code below) slightly so that I could specify the search folder in an argument; i.e. I changed my @dirs = ("."); to my @dirs = ($ARGV[0]);

But for some reason this wouldn't work -- it would open the folder, but would not identify any of the subdirectories as folders, apart from '.' and '..', so it never actually went beyond the specified root.

If I actively specified the folder (e.g. \Volumes\foo\bar) it still doesn't work. But, if I go back to my @dirs = ("."); and then sit in my desired folder (foo\bar) and call the script from its own folder (foo\boo\script.pl) it works fine.

Is this 'expected' behaviour? What am I missing?!

Many thanks,

Mat

use warnings;
use strict;

my @dirs = (".");
my %seen;
while (my $pwd = shift @dirs) {
        opendir(DIR,"$pwd") or die "Cannot open $pwd\n";
        my @files = readdir(DIR);
        closedir(DIR);
        foreach my $file (@files) {
                if (-d $file and ($file !~ /^\.\.?$/) and !$seen{$file}) {
                        $seen{$file} = 1;
                        push @dirs, "$pwd/$file";
                }
                next if ($file !~ /\.txt$/i);
                my $mtime = (stat("$pwd/$file"))[9];
                print "$pwd $file $mtime";
                print "\n";
        }
}
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Are you sure it would open the directory? It looks like your paths need forward slashes not backward slashes. –  squiguy Nov 14 '12 at 0:38
    
Well, it didn't die on the opendir command and it successfully picked out '.' and '..' as folders. Plus if I stuck in a print ("@files"); after the closedir it printed out the names of the other folders. But if I looped through them, it wouldn't id them as folders. Mega weird huh?! –  Mat Nov 14 '12 at 0:55

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The problem is that you are using the -d operator on the file basename without its path. Perl will look in the current working directory for a directory of that name and return true if it finds one there, when it should be looking in $pwd.

This solution changes $file to always hold the full name of the file or directory, including the path.

use strict;
use warnings;

my @dirs = (shift);
my %seen;

while (my $pwd = shift @dirs) {

  opendir DIR, $pwd or die "Cannot open $pwd\n";
  my @files = readdir DIR;
  closedir DIR;

  foreach (@files) {

    next if /^\.\.?$/;

    my $file = "$pwd/$_";
    next if $seen{$file};

    if ( -d $file ) {
      $seen{$file} = 1;
      push @dirs, $file;
    }
    elsif ( $file =~ /\.txt$/i ) {
      my $mtime = (stat $file)[9];
      print "$file $mtime\n";
    }

  }
}
share|improve this answer

use full path with -d

-d "$pwd/$file"
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