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First day learning Objective-C but have a java background. I'd like to use the same variable name for my parameter that I do for my instance variable. In java we do it like this

public class Person
{
    private String name;
    private String age;

    public void setName(String name)
    {
        this.name = name;
    }
    public void setAge(String age)
    {
        this.age = age;
    }
}

In objective c so far I have this

@interface Person : NSObject
{
    int age;
    int name;
}
    -(void) setAge:(int) age;
    -(void) setName:(int) name;
    -(int) getAge;
    -(int) getName;
@end

@implementation Person
-(void) setName:(int) w
{
    weight = w;
}
-(void) setAge:(int) a
{
    age = a;
}
-(int) getName
{
    return name;
}
-(int) getAge
{
    return age;
}
@end
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you need to rehprase this a bit so it actually sounds like a question –  Keith Nicholas Nov 14 '12 at 2:09
    
Do you mean like self? It refers to the current instance but both are structured quite differently –  John Nov 14 '12 at 2:09
    
self is giving me an error. "local declaration of age is hiding instance variable" –  gmustudent Nov 14 '12 at 2:15
    
Initialize them as @property's of Person and use @synthesize to create the getter and setter for the implementation. –  John Nov 14 '12 at 2:19

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In Objective-C, you can define your own accessors or use @syntehsize to create them automatically for you.

In the case where you want to define accessors manually, setters are declared like this:

- (void)setName:(NSString *)name {

    self.name = name;
}

- (void)setAge:(NSInteger)age {

    self.age = age;
}

For getters, you simply declare them as follows:

- (NSString *)name {

    return self.name;
}

- (NSInteger)age {

    return self.age;
}
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What does this NS stuff mean? Totally foreign to me as a Java guy. How is NSInteger different from int? –  gmustudent Nov 14 '12 at 2:17
    
And why the asterick? –  gmustudent Nov 14 '12 at 2:18
    
NS is just a prefix used in Cocoa's Foundation. The asterisk means you're declaring a pointer. Java handles pointers automatically. With any C language, you have to handle that yourself. Objective-C is no exception. Basically, anything that is not a primitive type needs to be declared as a pointer. –  Simon Germain Nov 14 '12 at 2:20
    
So NSInteger is a primitive type and NSString is an object type? –  gmustudent Nov 14 '12 at 2:22
    
Yes, that's correct. –  Simon Germain Nov 14 '12 at 2:22

in ObjectiveC the way to refer to 'this' is 'self'

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You have this in ObjectiveC because you are using C style variables. If you declare that variables as ObjectiveC properties and use the correct synthesize instruction:

@property (int) age;

@synthesize age;

Then you can refer to them through self.age

self.age = age;

in the implementation file. This will internally call the -(void)setAge:(int)age method and the -(int) age methods which will be defined automatically.

Finally since an ObjectiveC object is nothing more than a pointer to a C struct you can access variables by skipping ObjectiveC by using the syntax to refer to fields of a pointer to a struct: self->age = age

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Getting an error. In my interface I have -(void) setAge:(int) age; and then in my implementation I did the code like you said but it says local declaration of age is hiding instance variable –  gmustudent Nov 14 '12 at 2:14

Objective-C programmers don't like typing, so we do it like this:

@interface Person : NSObject
@property(nonatomic, copy) NSString *name;
@property(nonatomic, assign) int age;
@end

@implementation Person
@end

You may want to start by reading Apple's Objective-C Programming Language introduction.

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